Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump fired John Bolton, his third national security adviser, after months of disagreement over the direction of foreign policy; The president’s approval numbers dipped below 40% as jitters over a potential recession materialize, but Democrats warn the president’s approval ratings remain strong in rural areas of swing states; A House panel grappled with how Congress should respond to the $1.5 trillion in student loan debt borrowers have racked up, and more.

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National

(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

1.) President Donald Trump on Tuesday fired John Bolton, his third national security adviser, after months of disagreement over the direction of foreign policy.

(AP Photo/Richard Drew)

2.) President Trump’s approval numbers dipped below 40% as jitters over a potential recession materialize, but Democrats warn the president’s approval ratings remain strong in rural areas of swing states.

(AP Photo/Leo Correa)

3.) The thousands of fires that have been engulfing the Amazon Basin since last month are largely a cause of Brazilian policy failure and climate change, witnesses told a House panel Tuesday.

(AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

4.) Bringing to Congress an issue that has become a prominent fixture of the 2020 Democratic primary, a House panel on Tuesday grappled with how Congress should respond to the $1.5 trillion in student loan debt borrowers have racked up.

(AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

5.) Senate Democrats will force a vote to terminate the national emergency President Donald Trump declared in February that allowed him to move money from other federal accounts into the fund for his long-promised border wall, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Tuesday.

Regional

6.) Montana can’t outlaw political robocalls, the Ninth Circuit ruled Tuesday, finding the state’s law violates the First Amendment, hamstrings underdog candidates and fails to protect recipients from financial scams.

(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

7.) The amount Pacific Gas and Electric must pay wildfire victims will be based on expert opinions on the average damages for wrongful death and property loss claims, along with prior PG&E settlements in similar disputes, a federal judge said in court Tuesday.

International

8.) What happened to Trudy Scheele-Gertsen in 1968 wasn’t unique. She was one of over 10,000 women forced to give up their children by the Dutch government because they were unwed. But she is the only person to sue the state for damages.

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