Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including former special counsel Robert Mueller closed out his testimony before Congress with pointed criticism of President Donald Trump’s penchant for praising WikiLeaks; Facebook will pay $5 billion and adhere to new privacy guidelines following a sweeping Federal Trade Commission investigation into the mishandling of personal user data; Boris Johnson delivered his first speech as the British prime minister, and more.

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National

1.) Roundly ignoring conspiracy-theory bait by Republicans, former special counsel Robert Mueller closed out his testimony before Congress on Wednesday with pointed criticism of President Donald Trump’s penchant for praising WikiLeaks.

(AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

2.) Hours after a federal judge in Washington refused to block new rules that make asylum off limits to most noncitizens reaching the U.S.-Mexico border, opponents asked a federal judge in San Francisco to stop the policy.

(AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

3.) Social media giant Facebook will pay $5 billion and adhere to new privacy guidelines following a sweeping Federal Trade Commission investigation into the mishandling of personal user data.

(AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

4.) Nine Democratic presidential hopefuls gathered Wednesday at the 110th NAACP National Convention in Detroit for an open forum that touched on economic inequality, criminal justice reform, voter suppression and white nationalism.

Regional

(AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

5.) A federal judge temporarily blocked the enforcement of a set of Arkansas laws that would have eliminated abortions in some cases and likely would have forced the shuttering of the state’s only surgical abortion clinic.

6.) Civil rights protesters who were arrested and ejected from a ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair were not denied their First Amendment rights, a divided Sixth Circuit ruled.

7.) An Alabama attorney claimed Wednesday that under state law, anyone can do what his client is hoping to achieve: Successfully sue an abortion provider for wrongful death after getting a letter of administration to represent the estate of an aborted embryo or fetus.

International

(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

8.) Boris Johnson, standing in front of No. 10 Downing Street, delivered his first speech as the British prime minister on Wednesday, pushing a go-it-alone approach for the United Kingdom and urging his country to not fear leaving the European Union without a deal.

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