Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Justice Department attorneys told a federal judge they will continue their fight to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census; Hiring rebounded strongly in June as employers added 224,000 new jobs; A team of researchers found troubling flaws with facial recognition cameras deployed by London police in the past three years, and more.

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National

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) A week after the Supreme Court rebuked the government’s contrived rationale for changing the 2020 census to include a citizenship question, Justice Department attorneys told a federal judge Friday they will continue their fight.

(Photo via Amazur/Wikipedia Commons)

2.) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its plans Friday to designate a Maryland ship “graveyard” on the Potomac River as a national marine sanctuary, the first such designation in the state and on the Chesapeake Bay.

(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

3.) With the economy marking 10 consecutive years of growth, hiring rebounded strongly last month as employers added 224,000 new jobs.

Regional

(CNS Photo/Martin Macias Jr.)

4.) For longtime, working-class residents of Venice – a Los Angeles neighborhood founded in 1905 – the postcard image of palm tree-lined boardwalks and sun-kissed beachgoers doesn’t match their experience. Waves of rampant urbanization, over-policing, spikes in cost of living and government acquiescence to developers and tech companies have created a tumultuous environment that is hard to cope with.

5.) A divided Eighth Circuit panel reinstated an involuntary manslaughter charge Friday against a South Dakota woman whose son died hours after birth and was found to have illegal drugs in his system.

International

(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

6.) A team of researchers found troubling flaws with facial recognition cameras deployed by London police in the past three years, including a very high rate of wrongly identifying people as criminals. The researchers concluded that the use of real-time facial scanning is probably illegal under British law.

7.) Cheers erupted in a Dutch courtroom as the Netherlands’ most notorious underworld figure, Willem Holleeder, was convicted of five murders, including his own brother-in-law, and sentenced to life in prison.

8.) Europe’s top court backed Lithuania on Friday for barring broadcasts of a Russian propaganda channel except as part of a pay-per-view subscription.

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