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Nightly Brief

Top CNS stories for today including the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against GOP power player Roger Stone said in court that she might issue a gag order; The Trump administration said it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War; The Pentagon reported that sexual harassment at U.S. military academies rose by nearly 50 percent since last year’s survey, and more.

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against GOP power player Roger Stone said in court that she might issue a gag order; The Trump administration said it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War; The Pentagon reported that sexual harassment at U.S. military academies rose by nearly 50 percent since last year’s survey, and more.  

Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day’s top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.

National

Roger Stone arrives at federal court on Jan. 29, 2019, in Washington. The former campaign adviser for President Donald Trump was arrested in the special counsel's Russia investigation. He is charged with lying to Congress and obstructing the probe. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

1.) Dropping a well-timed Patriots reference, the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against GOP power player Roger Stone said in court Friday morning that she might issue a gag order.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at the beginning of a July 16, 2018, meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland. If Donald Trump is serious about his public courtship of Vladimir Putin, he may want to take pointers from one of the Russian leader's longtime suitors: Chinese President Xi Jinping. In this political love triangle, Putin and Xi are tied by strategic need and a rare dose of personal affection, while Trump's effusive display in Helsinki showed him as an earnest admirer of the man leading a country long considered America's adversary. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

2.) The Trump administration said Friday it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War. Some analysts worry the move could fuel a new arms race.

3.) In its first report to include details on alcohol use, the Pentagon reported that sexual harassment at U.S. military academies rose by nearly 50 percent since last year’s survey. 

FILE- In this Jan. 3, 2019, file photo an employment sign hangs from a wooden fence on the property of a McDonald's restaurant in Atlantic Highlands, N.J. On Friday, Feb. 1, the U.S. government issues the January jobs report, which will reveal the latest unemployment rate and number of jobs U.S. employers added. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

4.) Despite a partial government shutdown that lasted through most of January, the Labor Department said Friday that American employers added 304,000 jobs last month, continuing the longest job-creation streak on record.

Regional

5.) The anti-sanctuary city law that went into effect in Tennessee Jan. 1 has left one man’s friends and family in fear in their hometown.

FILE- In this Jan. 22, 2018, file photo, a motorist pumps gas in Bethel Park, Pa. On Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, the Labor Department reports on U.S. producer price inflation for January. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

6.) A duty-free gas station located immediately before the Ambassador Bridge that connects the United States and Canada argued Friday before a Sixth Circuit panel that the imposition of air quality standards on the fuel it sells is unconstitutional.

International

Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini. (Riccardo Antimiani/ANSA via AP)

7.) An unusual high-stakes legal and political battle is unfolding in Italy over the nation’s harsh new anti-immigrant policies and whether its most prominent advocate, the far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, should face criminal charges for carrying those policies out.

8.) On the morning of Feb. 22, 2012, renowned war reporter Marie Colvin awoke to the sound of rockets in Homs, Syria. This week, a federal judge in Washington found the Syrian government liable for Colvin’s death and ordered the government pay more than $302 million in damages to members of her family.

Categories / Uncategorized

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