Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against GOP power player Roger Stone said in court that she might issue a gag order; The Trump administration said it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War; The Pentagon reported that sexual harassment at U.S. military academies rose by nearly 50 percent since last year’s survey, and more.  

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National

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

1.) Dropping a well-timed Patriots reference, the federal judge presiding over the criminal case against GOP power player Roger Stone said in court Friday morning that she might issue a gag order.

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

2.) The Trump administration said Friday it is withdrawing from a treaty that has been a centerpiece of superpower arms control since the Cold War. Some analysts worry the move could fuel a new arms race.

3.) In its first report to include details on alcohol use, the Pentagon reported that sexual harassment at U.S. military academies rose by nearly 50 percent since last year’s survey. 

(AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

4.) Despite a partial government shutdown that lasted through most of January, the Labor Department said Friday that American employers added 304,000 jobs last month, continuing the longest job-creation streak on record.

Regional

5.) The anti-sanctuary city law that went into effect in Tennessee Jan. 1 has left one man’s friends and family in fear in their hometown.

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

6.) A duty-free gas station located immediately before the Ambassador Bridge that connects the United States and Canada argued Friday before a Sixth Circuit panel that the imposition of air quality standards on the fuel it sells is unconstitutional.

International

(Riccardo Antimiani/ANSA Via AP)

7.) An unusual high-stakes legal and political battle is unfolding in Italy over the nation’s harsh new anti-immigrant policies and whether its most prominent advocate, the far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, should face criminal charges for carrying those policies out.

(Photo via Center for Justice & Accountability)

8.) On the morning of Feb. 22, 2012, renowned war reporter Marie Colvin awoke to the sound of rockets in Homs, Syria. This week, a federal judge in Washington found the Syrian government liable for Colvin’s death and ordered the government pay more than $302 million in damages to members of her family.

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