Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including U.S. federal prosecutors charged China’s Huawei, two subsidiaries and its CFO Meng Wanzhou in a money-laundering conspiracy that has roiled international relations in three countries; Thousands of Virginia educators marched on the state capitol to demand increased school funding and better pay for teachers; Spain’s judiciary will come under intense scrutiny in the coming months as its high court holds a politically explosive trial of Catalan independence leaders, and more.

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National

(AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

1.) Leveling indictments from coast to coast late Monday, U.S. federal prosecutors charged China’s Huawei, two subsidiaries and its CFO Meng Wanzhou in a money-laundering conspiracy that has roiled international relations in three countries.

(CNS Photo/Brad Kutner)

2.) Inspired by similar efforts in other parts of the country, thousands of Virginia educators marched on the state capitol Monday to demand increased school funding and better pay for teachers.

(Image via Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC)

3.) Digging its teeth into plans for the already delayed Mountain Valley Pipeline, the D.C. Circuit appeared critical Monday of a glaring hole in the government’s environmental research.

(CNS Photo/Helen Christophi)

4.) In a scathing rebuke of the Trump administration’s divisive politics, Senator Kamala Harris of California launched her bid for the U.S. presidency at an Oakland rally Sunday by promising to unite the nation and reclaim its democratic institutions if elected in 2020.

Regional

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

5.) Texas officials said they identified 95,000 registered voters who were not U.S. citizens when they obtained state driver’s licenses or identification cards and are asking counties to confirm their current citizenship status and eligibility to vote, resulting in critics accusing the state of fear-mongering and voter suppression.

(AP Photo/Mathew Sumner)

6.) Seeking a “tax holiday” to boost sluggish recreational marijuana sales, California lawmakers have reintroduced a bill that would temporarily lower taxes for the legal pot industry.

7.) The 11th Circuit on Friday begrudgingly granted a former Georgia district attorney qualified immunity from claims that he defamed a wrongfully convicted prisoner in retaliation for seeking compensation after his exoneration.

International

(AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

8.) Spain’s judiciary, which critics say is too cozy with the country’s dominant political parties, will come under intense scrutiny in the coming months as its high court holds a politically explosive trial of Catalan independence leaders accused of rebellion and sedition.

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