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Nightly Brief

Top CNS stories for today including an advance copy of attorney general nominee William Barr’s statement to senators shows he will vow not to interfere in the special counsel’s investigation; The U.S. Supreme Court turned down a gun-rights case that more subtly challenged the legitimacy of Acting U.S. Attorney General Matt Whitaker’s appointment by President Donald Trump; A federal judge blocked new Trump administration rules from taking effect in 14 states allowing employers to opt out of covering birth control on religious and moral grounds, and more.

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including an advance copy of attorney general nominee William Barr’s statement to senators shows he will vow not to interfere in the special counsel’s investigation; The U.S. Supreme Court turned down a gun-rights case that more subtly challenged the legitimacy of Acting U.S. Attorney General Matt Whitaker’s appointment by President Donald Trump; Porn actress Stormy Daniels claims the allegiance of several Ohio police detectives to Trump was behind her arrest at a strip club last year, and more.

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National

President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee, William Barr, meets with Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 9, 2019. As attorney general a quarter century ago, William Barr promoted more police and prisons to address violence ravaging American cities. He bemoaned a "moral crisis” and rising secularism. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) The Senate is not set to confirm William Barr as U.S. attorney general until Tuesday, but an advance copy of the nominee’s statement shows Barr will vow not to interfere in the special counsel’s investigation.

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

2.) The U.S. Supreme Court turned down a gun-rights case Monday that more subtly challenged the legitimacy of Acting U.S. Attorney General Matt Whitaker’s appointment by President Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters on the South Lawn of the White House before departing Washington for the American Farm Bureau Federation's 100th Annual Convention in New Orleans on Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

3.) Set to hear from convicted ex-Trump attorney Michael Cohen next month, Democratic lawmakers chairing several investigative committees issued the White House a stark warning: witness obstruction will not be tolerated.

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2007 file photo, Stormy Daniels arrives for the 49th Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. A nonprofit watchdog group has asked the Justice Department and Office of Government Ethics to investigate whether a secret payment to Daniels made prior to the 2016 presidential election violated federal law because Donald Trump did not list it on his financial disclosure forms. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)

4.) Stormy Daniels, the porn actress who claimed President Trump paid her hush money to cover up an alleged 2006 affair, sued several Ohio police detectives Monday, claiming their allegiance to Trump was behind her arrest at a strip club last year.

FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, Tim Hitchens, of Gulfprort, Miss., pulls in a fish while fishing from a pier in the Gulf of Mexico, the morning after Tropical Storm Gordon made landfall nearby, in Biloxi, Miss. The rules that govern recreational marine fishing in the U.S. will get an overhaul due to a new law passed by in December. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

5.)Recreational marine fishing regulations will be overhauled after Congress passed a set of rules last month known as the Modern Fish Act, bringing a wave of changes in how recreational fishing data is collected and used that could lead to longer seasons.

Regional

Teachers and students picket in the rain outside Benjamin Franklin High School on Jan. 14 after contract negotiations with the Los Angeles Unified School District broke down. (Nathan Solis/CNS)

6.) Rain fell on more than 30,000 Los Angeles Unified School District educators as they picketed and marched outside classrooms and schools Monday, the first day of a strike demanding class size reductions, more social workers and librarians and better pay for teachers at the nation’s second largest public-school districts.

7.) Opponents of what they call Chicago’s “draconian” ordinance regulating Airbnb rentals must start from scratch because none of the individual hosts bringing the case have standing to challenge the law, the Seventh Circuit ruled Monday.

Julian Castro announces his run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination in San Antonio on Jan. 12, 2019. (Photo by ERIK DE LA GARZA, Courthouse News Service)

8.) Standing under a clear blue sky in the city he led as mayor, Julian Castro, the former housing and urban development secretary, announced that he will seek the 2020 Democratic nomination for president.

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