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Nightly Brief

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump said he would be willing to keep the government closed for “months or even years” until he gets the funding he has demanded for a border wall; American employers beat expectations and added 312,000 jobs in December; Courthouse News’ western bureau chief tests his luck at Grand Teton National Park in his latest dispatch, and more.

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump said he would be willing to keep the government closed for “months or even years” until he gets the funding he has demanded for a border wall; American employers beat expectations and added 312,000 jobs in December; Courthouse News’ western bureau chief tests his luck at Grand Teton National Park in his latest dispatch, and more.

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National

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks to reporters after meeting with President Donald Trump about border security in the Situation Room of the White House, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, in Washington. From left, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Md., Pelosi, and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

1.) A Friday meeting between congressional leaders and President Donald Trump produced no resolution to the ongoing partial government shutdown, as Trump said he would be willing to keep the government closed for “months or even years” until he gets the funding he has demanded for a border wall.

Outside Jackson Hole, Wyoming. (Chris Marshall/CNS)

2.) In his latest dispatch, Courthouse News’ western bureau chief tests his luck at Grand Teton National Park.

Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington on June 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

3.) In a brief and unsigned order, the D.C. Circuit cleared the way for the Trump administration to institute a policy that a federal judge equated with a blanket ban on transgender military service.

FILE- In this Nov. 2, 2017, file photo a recruiter from the postal service, right, speaks with an attendee of a job fair in the cafeteria of Deer Lakes High School in Cheswick, Pa. Even with fear of a global economic slump depressing stock markets, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 jobs report for December is expected to offer reassurance that the U.S. economy remains sturdy and on track to expand for a 10th straight year. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

4.) Beating expectations and easing fears of a recession, American employers added 312,000 jobs in December amid a struggling stock market, partial government shutdown and economic slowdown worldwide.

Regional

5.) Three New York City strip clubs were hit with a federal injunction after using supermodel Carmen Electra in their advertisements without permission.

Taken from a video posted to the "dragqueenstoryhour" Instagram page, this still shows Jessica Love, the author and illustrator of the "Julián Is a Mermaid," reading her picture book with a drag queen on Nov. 3, 2018, at McNally Jackson Books in New York.

6.) Christian activists who tried to stop Houston libraries from hosting “Drag Queen Storytime” because it allegedly promotes the LGBT community’s “secular humanist” religion lack standing, a federal judge ruled, dismissing the lawsuit.

In this Friday, April 27, 2018 photo, electioneers greet voters outside the Hamilton County Government Center during early voting in Noblesville, Ind. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is facing a backlog of requests for comprehensive cybersecurity reviews of state election systems. Among those still waiting is Indiana, which is one of four states with primaries on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

7.) A Florida county can continue to hold nonpartisan elections for offices such as sheriff and tax collector as long as those races are decided only in the general election, not the primary, the state’s high court ruled Friday.

8.) Los Angeles’ city attorney sued The Weather Channel, claiming it fraudulently and deceptively uses its Weather Channel App “to amass its users’ private, personal geolocation data,” not, as advertised — “to provide them with ‘personalized local weather data’”— but to monetize the information by selling it to third parties.

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