Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigning Wednesday saying in his resignation letter to President Donald Trump that he was doing so at “your request”; Georgia’s hotly contested and potentially historic governor’s race still not over yet; Surprise, surprise, another election ends with a Florida recount; hopes of laying a foundation for strong Democratic opposition to President Trump stumbled in California; giving Democrats little time to savor their election night wins, Republican leadership in the Senate tout a focus on confirming conservative judges; California residents reject a Republican-led attempt to repeal Brown’s recently enacted $52 billion transportation plan; New York’s League of Women Voters sues the state on Election Day, calling out its registration cutoff as an “arbitrary and unnecessary” barrier to the ballot, and more.

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National

In this March 27, 2017 photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions pauses while speaking to members of the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

1.) Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned Wednesday as the country’s chief law enforcement officer, saying in his resignation letter to President Donald Trump that he was doing so at “your request.”

Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks at the Macomber Recreation Building during a “Get Out The Vote” rally in Rincon, Ga., Monday, Nov. 5, 2018. (Alyssa Pointer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

2.) Georgia’s hotly contested and potentially historic governor’s race may not be over yet. Democrat Stacy Abrams refuses to concede, saying there are enough ballots uncounted in heavily Democratic metro Atlanta counties to bring the frontrunning Republican Brian Kemp below the majority threshold required for victory.

In this Oct. 23, 2018, photo shows Sen. Bill Nelson campaigns in Orlando. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP, File)

3.) Sen. Bill Nelson’s campaign announced Wednesday morning that his race against Florida Governor Rick Scott is headed to a recount

A group of victims of the USS Cole bombing, from left Rick Harrison and David Morales, who were aboard the USS Cole when it was bombed, and Lorrie Triplett, Jamal Gunn and David Francis, who all lost family members in the bombing. pose outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, following arguments in a case that stemmed from the bombing. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)

4.) U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared divided Wednesday over an effort by Sudan to avoid paying more than $314 million in damages to American sailors injured in a 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, a Navy destroyer.

Regional

(Map courtesy Realclearpolitics.com)

5.) Hopes of laying a foundation for strong Democratic opposition to President Trump stumbled in California on Tuesday, as several key races eyed for quelling the Republican stranglehold on Congress ended up remaining red.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, left, accompanied by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., the ranking member, right, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee markup meeting on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, in Washington.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

6.) Giving Democrats little time to savor their election night wins, Republican leadership in the Senate touted a focus Wednesday morning on confirming conservative judges.

In this Nov. 15, 2016 photo morning rush hour traffic makes it’s way along US 101 near downtown Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

7.) Delivering a parting gift to outgoing Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown, California voters rejected a Republican-led attempt to repeal Brown’s recently enacted $52 billion transportation plan known as the gas tax.

In this Feb. 24, 2015, photo, Randy Bryce, of Caledonia, Wis., with Iron Workers Local 8, reads his testimony outside a hearing room that is barricaded by police after he was not able to speak during a meeting for a right-to-work bill at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, Wis. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

8.) Wisconsin’s 1st District, held for 20 years by House Speaker Paul Ryan, remains red after Tuesday’s midterm election with Republican candidate Bryan Steil beating out Democratic challenger Randy Bryce.

Fall foliage in the town of Stowe, Vermont. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

9.) In the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states, New Hampshire was on its way to electing its first openly gay candidate to a U.S. House seat, a Latino Rhodes scholar took a contested house seat in New York, Elizabeth Warren easily held her Senate seat, Robert Menendez was also re-elected and Maine voted into office its first female governor – all as part of blue tide in the region.

In an Election Day ritual that pays homage to the voting rights pioneer, New Yorkers showed up by the dozen on Nov. 6, 2018, to put “I Voted” stickers on the headstone marking Susan B. Anthony’s grave in Rochester, N.Y. (Jessica Crane via AP)

10.) In the historical home of the suffragette movement, New York’s League of Women Voters sued the state on Election Day, calling out its registration cutoff as an “arbitrary and unnecessary” barrier to the ballot.

Voters wait on line to vote inside the fire bay at the Armada Twp. Fire Department, Tuesday , Nov. 6, 2018, in Armada Twp, Mich. (Todd McInturf /Detroit News via AP)

11.) Given the antipathy toward members of the media these days, I was anxious as I headed into Williamson County, Texas, to talk to voters in that deeply conservative area just north of Austin. I’d also never actually reported from a polling place before. How would voters react to me?

International

Authorities escort Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, center, from a plane to a waiting caravan of SUVs at Long Island MacArthur Airport, in Ronkonkoma, N.Y., on Jan. 19, 2017. (Photo via U.S. law enforcement)

12.) With opening statements still a week a way, attorneys ironed out a jury Wednesday for the New York trial of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

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