Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Sixth Circuit ruling Ohio’s elections board must count provisional ballots cast in next week’s midterm election by residents who were purged from voter rolls between 2011 and 2015; the Supreme Court will hear a case next week challenging Virginia’s right to block development of a uranium mine; the man accused of killing 11 people and wounding six others during a weekend siege at a Pittsburgh synagogue pleaded not guilty to federal charges that could result in his being put to death; in a lengthy speech that at times verged on being a diatribe, President Donald Trump says that asylum seekers must stop making a “mockery” of U.S. immigration laws; supporters of a ballot measure to raise taxes on San Francisco’s biggest companies to fight homelessness say the city must take bold steps to address the crisis; a regional high court in Germany invites a Peruvian farmer to bring a damage claim from 6,600 miles away against one of Germany’s largest power companies, and more.

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National

Ballots await further processing at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Julie Carr Smyth)

1.) Ohio’s elections board must count provisional ballots cast in next week’s midterm election by residents who were purged from voter rolls between 2011 and 2015, the Sixth Circuit ruled Wednesday.

Moina Shaiq holds a sign at a rally outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017.  (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

2.) For the group behind an anti-immigration measure on Oregon’s ballot this year, targeting sanctuary laws is just the beginning. Identified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Oregonians for Immigration Reform has both a record of political success and deep ties to white nationalists.

President Donald Trump arrives at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, from a campaign rally in Fort Myers, Fla. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

3.)  In a lengthy speech that at times verged on being a diatribe, President Donald Trump said Thursday that asylum seekers must stop making a “mockery” of U.S. immigration laws and must go to ports of entry in order to make a claim.

4.) Forty years ago, the largest uranium deposit in North America was discovered under the sleepy Appalachian foothills of Southern Virginia. The dispute over whether to mine it will be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court next week.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks during a news conference to announce a criminal law enforcement action involving China, at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

5.) The Justice Department on Thursday charged companies in China and Taiwan and three individuals with stealing trade secrets from a U.S. semi-conductor company.

People hold candles as they gather for a vigil in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation, in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
6.) The man accused of killing 11 people and wounding six others during a weekend siege at a Pittsburgh synagogue pleaded not guilty Thursday to federal charges that could result in his being put to death.
Tim Leissner and wife Kimora Lee Simmons (AP)

Regional

8.) Texas’ 31st Congressional District, north of Austin, has never elected a Democrat since it was created in 2002, and the decorated Air Force veteran seeking to oust eight-term Republican Congressman John Carter, who defended his seat by a 22 percentage point margin in 2016, has a tough fight on her hands.

A homeless person sleeps on the sidewalk in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. (Nicholas Iovino/CNS)

9.) Supporters of a ballot measure to raise taxes on San Francisco’s biggest companies to fight homelessness say the city must take bold steps to address the crisis. But opponents say it will accomplish little more than harm to the city’s booming job market.

In this undated photo released by Fred Leuchter, center, he stands near the control panel for the electric chair he built. Leuchter says he is afraid the chair will malfunction at an execution scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018, because of later modifications. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he is confident it will work. (Courtesy of Fred Leuchter via AP)

10.) Calling it “an accident waiting to happen,” the man who built Tennessee’s electric chair told Courthouse News that modifications made to the machine may not do an effective job in Thursday night’s planned execution of a double murderer.

11.) An unusual criminal trial against a motorcycle gang began Wednesday with a federal prosecutor promising jurors they would soon watch members of the Mongol Nation committing acts of violence and hear the bikers describe and even boast about their crimes — yet no one will go to jail.

International

In this Thursday, July 12, 2018 photo, a view of an Iceberg, near the village Innarsuit, on the northwestern Greenlandic coast. Scientists have watched an iceberg four miles long break off from a glacier. The iceberg is allegedly grounded on the sea floor. Residents in houses near the shore are prepared for an evacuation. (Magnus Kristensen/Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

12.) A regional high court in Germany has invited a Peruvian farmer to bring a damage claim from 6,600 miles away. He blames RWE, one of Germany’s largest power companies, for contributing to global warming and causing a glacier above his home in the Andes to dangerously melt.

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