Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including lawsuits piling up against state elections officials in Georgia just weeks before a historic election; in the state; the constitutionality of several Kentucky campaign finance laws is debated before the Sixth Circuit panel;a panel of New York appeals court judges considera whether President Donald Trump can be held in contempt for refusing to be deposed in a defamation case brought by former “Apprentice” contestant Summer Zervos; the Ninth Circuit is told a jury should decide whether to hold McDonald’s liable for violating California’s wage and hour laws; a new study suggests that while Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci excelled in various fields of art and science, his perception of the world may have been altered due to an eye condition; French far-left leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon faces a deepening probe into allegations of improperly using European Parliament funds to pay campaign workers, and possible charges of intimidation and violence after his hot-headed response to raids on his Paris home and party headquarters, and more.

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National

In this Monday Oct. 8, 2018, photo, Leila Hart, 21, explains early voting and absentee voting to a resident in Forest Park, Ga.  (AP Photo/Bill Barrows)

1.) With less than three weeks to go before a historic election in Georgia, lawsuits are piling up against state elections officials, including current Secretary of State and GOP candidate for governor Brian Kemp.

2.) The constitutionality of several Kentucky campaign finance laws was debated Thursday morning before a Sixth Circuit panel, with the state’s attorney general arguing they are necessary to maintain citizens’ confidence in the government.

In this combination photo, President Donald Trump, left, listens during a meeting on healthcare in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on March 13, 2017, in Washington, and Summer Zervos, a former contestant on “The Apprentice,” appears at a news conference in Los Angeles on Oct. 14, 2016. (AP Photos/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, left, and Ringo H.W. Chiu, Files)

3.) A panel of New York appeals court judges considered Thursday afternoon whether President Donald Trump can be held in contempt for refusing to be deposed in a defamation case brought by former “Apprentice” contestant Summer Zervos.

(Levi Lass/CNS)

4.) The 2018 midterm election has besieged North Dakota. Every YouTube ad, every television, every billboard tells the tale of the Peace Garden State’s very own David versus Goliath. But who is the giant and who is the plucky underdog with the sling? It depends who you ask.

Wearing “butterfly wings,” supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program hold a tarp with an image of President Donald Trump as they march in support of DACA, Monday, March 5, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

5.) Frustrated with the slow pace of its appeal, the Trump administration on Wednesday threatened to ask the Supreme Court to review an injunction protecting some 700,000 young immigrants from deportation.

Regional

Candidates for North Carolina’s 9th Congressional District seat, Democrat Dan McCready and Republican Mark Harris during their first televised debate earlier this month. (Screen grab via CSPAN)

6.) A televised debate between congressional candidates in North Carolina on Wednesday night quickly evolved into a punch-and-counterpunch session as the men quarreled over “two very different visions of America.”

In this April 24, 2017, photo, corporate signage hangs at a McDonald’s restaurant in downtown Pittsburgh.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

7.) A jury should decide whether to hold McDonald’s liable for violating California’s wage and hour laws, an attorney for a class of employees told a three-judge Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday.

NCAA basketball recruit Brian Bowen is photographed before a Jan. 16, 2018, basketball game in Columbia, S.C. Bowen’s recruitment is central to a conspiracy case underway in New York where a recruiter, a coach and a former Adidas executive are accused of corrupting the game. (AP Photo/Sean Rayford, file)

8.) After two days of closing arguments in a New York courtroom, the first federal bribery and corruption trial in NCAA basketball history will go to a jury to decide whether an alleged scheme to funnel money from Adidas to families of recruits victimized colleges that sought top players.

Science

Leonardo da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi” depicts a half-length figure of Christ with one hand raised in blessing and the other holding an orb.

9.) Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci excelled in various fields of art and science, but a new study analyzes several works of art to determine if his perception of the world was altered due to an eye condition.

The fossil of a newly discovered piranha-like fish from the Jurassic period. It likely used its sharp pointed teeth to feed on the fins of other fish. (M. Ebert/T. Nohl)

10.) Bony ray-finned fish with sharp teeth nibbled on other fish in the sea about 150 million years ago, according to researchers who say the newly discovered piranha-like creature presents the earliest evidence of fish feeding on other fish.

Research & Polls

Two men watch a parade from a window as members of the gay community and their supporters celebrate the the legalization same-sex marriage. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

11.) Lesbian, gay and bisexual adults in California are more likely to delay seeing a doctor or visiting an emergency room even when their insurance coverage rates are similar to those of straight Californians, according to a study published Wednesday.

International

12.) French far-left leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon is facing a deepening probe into allegations of improperly using European Parliament funds to pay campaign workers, and possible charges of intimidation and violence after his hot-headed response to raids on his Paris home and party headquarters.

13.) A German man who blamed a family member for illegally uploading an audiobook to a file-sharing service cannot duck civil liability since the internet connection used is in his name, the European Court of Justice ruled Thursday.

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