Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including early, in-person voting getting underwat in Georgia where Republican Brian Kemp, currently Georgia’s secretary of state, and Democrat Stacey Abrams are vying to succeed Nathan Deal as the next governor; accused Russian spy Maria Butina files a letter requesting the government turn over criminal records, arrest reports and details on witnesses prosecutors might use to build their case against her; the Supreme Court agrees to review a Second Circuit ruling involving the application of the First Amendment to the private operator of a public-access television channel; the Florida Supreme Court rules that the state’s next governor and not current Republican incumbent Gov. Rick Scott will get to pick three new justices to the state Supreme Court; a new study says the global supply of beer could be the next victim of climate change; Bavarian voters did what they were expected to do Sunday: They dealt German’s ruling “grand coalition” of conservatives and Social Democrats a resounding defeat, and more.

Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day’s top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.

National

In this Monday Oct. 8, 2018, photo, Leila Hart, 21, explains early voting and absentee voting to a resident in Forest Park, Ga. (AP Photo/Bill Barrows)

1.) Early, in-person voting began Monday in Georgia where Republican Brian Kemp, currently Georgia’s secretary of state, and Democrat Stacey Abrams are vying to succeed Nathan Deal as the next governor.

Mariia Butina in Moscow, in a photo she posted to Facebook in October 2013.

2.) Accused Russian spy Maria Butina on Sunday filed a letter requesting the government turn over criminal records, arrest reports and details on witnesses prosecutors might use to build their case against her.

In this July 8, 2017, photo people walk into a Sears store slated for closing that is next to a mall that is being torn down in Overland Park, Kan. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

3.) Sears, once a powerhouse of American retail, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Monday and said it will close 142 stores amid mounting debt.

MNN El Barrio Firehouse Community Media Center, which opened in East Harlem in 2012. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

4.) The Supreme Court on Friday agreed to review a Second Circuit ruling involving the application of the First Amendment to the private operator of a public-access television channel.

Regional

(Photo by Bruin79 via Wikipedia Commons)

5.) The Florida Supreme Court ruled Monday that the state’s next governor and not current Republican incumbent Gov. Rick Scott will get to pick three new justices to the state Supreme Court.

This photo provided by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment shows Christopher Lloyd, left, as Dr. Emmett Brown, and Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly in the 1985 film, “Back to the Future.” (Universal Pictures Home Entertainment via AP)

6.) A federal judge on Friday dismissed a royalties lawsuit brought by the widow of the inventor of the DeLorean, the car made famous as the time machine in the “Back to the Future” movies, finding her claims are barred by a 2015 settlement agreement.

A can of Dutch Boy Lead Paint. (Photo by Thester11 via Wikipedia Commons)

7.) The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected bid by paint companies to avoid liability over lead paint abatement in California.

Science

This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

8.) The global supply of beer could be the next victim of climate change, according to a study published Monday in Nature Plants.

International

9.) Bavarian voters did what they were expected to do Sunday: They dealt German’s ruling “grand coalition” of conservatives and Social Democrats a resounding defeat at the polls. It’s a defeat that casts doubt on the leadership of Chancellor Angela Merkel, Europe’s political lodestar.

Calabria, in southern Italy.

10.) Italy’s anti-immigrant government is seeking to end a small southern Italian town’s years-long celebrated effort to reinvigorate its dwindling population by welcoming immigrants and refugees.

No longer interested in emails from Courthouse News? Please click here to unsubscribe.

%d bloggers like this: