Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg pausing the Second Circuit’s approval of the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross over the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census; in other Supreme Court news, the justices grappled with how quickly the government must pick up immigrants following their release from prison if it want to initiate deportation proceedings and North Dakota’s new voter ID requirements, which they decided to keep in place; the Second Circuit lifts a ban on the release of a biopic that probes the 1977 plane crash that killed the front man and other members of the band Lynyrd Skynyrd; the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to write off nearly $90 million in fees imposed on thousands of families with children in the juvenile justice system; a new study indicates certain shifts in what food we consume and how we handle food waste could make feeding the world sustainable in the coming decades; the Justice Department inspector general fails to identify who leaked a sensitive UK intelligence report about the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing, and more.

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National

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at the Georgetown University Law Center campus in Washington on Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

1.) Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg late Tuesday paused the Second Circuit’s approval of the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross over the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

The Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

2.) The Supreme Court grappled Wednesday with how quickly the government must pick up immigrants following their release from prison if it want to initiate deportation proceedings, during which time these individuals would be held without bond.

In this Feb. 26, 2014 photo, an election official checks a voter’s photo identification. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

3.) The Supreme Court late Tuesday kept North Dakota’s new voter ID requirements in place, as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg warned of a serious risk of disenfranchisement.

Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves court after a May 23, 2018, hearing in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

4.) A federal judge signed off on the forfeiture of ex-Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort’s Trump Tower apartment and his home in the Hamptons on Wednesday, ordering the Justice Department to take control of them later this month.

Regional

This satellite image made available by NOAA shows Hurricane Michael, center, in the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018 at 3:17 p.m. EDT. (NOAA via AP)

5.) Hurricane Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach on the Florida panhandle Wednesday afternoon packing winds of 155 mph winds.

The wreckage of a plane in a wooded area near McComb, Miss., on Oct. 20, 1977, where six people were killed, including three members of the music group Lynyrd Skynyrd. (AP Photo, File)

6.) The Second Circuit lifted a ban Wednesday on the release of a biopic that probes the 1977 plane crash that killed the front man and other members of the band Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Science

A Rohingya man stretches his arms out for food distributed by local volunteers, with bags of puffed rice stuffed into his vest at Kutupalong, Bangladesh, on Sept. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

9.) Despite grim news about climate change, a new study indicates certain shifts in what food we consume and how we handle food waste could make feeding the world sustainable in the coming decades.

International

People sit under a billboard in Manchester city centre, Tuesday May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

10.) The Justice Department inspector general said Wednesday that it failed to identify who leaked a sensitive UK intelligence report about the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing, but that four FBI employees violated agency policy by forwarding the sensitive report.

11.) The International Criminal Court is examining a complaint filed against France over its past program of nuclear tests in the South Pacific, Courthouse News has confirmed.

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