Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including America watching agog as Christine Blasey Ford gave emotional testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee about her alleged assault in 1982 by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, and Kavanaugh later delivered his lengthy rebutal; in a batch of five cases taken up for the start of the October term, the Supreme Court agrees to review claims over a fishing trip that turned fatal when public utility workers attempted to raise a downed power line from the Tennessee River, ninety-eight mountain goats are starting over in the peaks of the Cascade Mountains in Washington state, after the government flew them there from the Olympic Peninsula; a California landowner scored a major court victory Wednesday when a federal judge ruled that the government wrongly designated 56 acres of its land as critical habitat for the Riverside fairy shrimp; a former West Virginia Supreme Court justice sues the state claiming lawmakers had violated her constitutional rights to free speech and due process; a new study suggests half of the world’s killer whale populations could collapse in the next century due to the buildup of toxic PCBs, and more.

Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day’s top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.

National

Christine Blasey Ford is sworn in to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018, as her attorney’s Debra Katz and Michael Bromwich watch. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)

1.) Concluding a five-hour session at the Senate Judiciary Committee, Christine Blasey Ford gave emotional testimony Thursday about her alleged assault in 1982 by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, a night she said has been “seared” into her memory.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. (Jim Bourg/Pool Photo via AP)

2.) Defending its authority to keep underage immigrants from getting abortions, the government urged the D.C. Circuit on Wednesday to vacate a nationwide injunction.

The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, Friday, April 20, 2018. The Supreme Court this week will consider the latest version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban against people coming from majority Muslim nations. It will be the high court’s first deep dive into a Trump administration policy. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

3.) In a batch of five cases taken up for the start of the October term, the Supreme Court agreed Thursday to review claims over a fishing trip that turned fatal when public utility workers attempted to raise a downed power line from the Tennessee River.

In this April 23, 2018, photo, the logo for ExxonMobil appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

4.) Chevron, Exxon Mobil and Occidental Petroleum this week signed on to the fight against climate change, joining a coalition of oil companies pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, tacitly rejecting the Trump administration’s rollback of environmental regulations.

Regional

Goats are sedated and blindfolded before being put into harnesses as part of the goat relocation project, on Thursday, September 13, 2018, on Hurricane Ridge in the Olympic National Park, Wash. (Ramon Dompor/The Seattle Times via AP)

5.) Ninety-eight mountain goats are starting over in the peaks of the Cascade Mountains in Washington state, after the government flew them there from the Olympic Peninsula, in an effort to eradicate the animals from an area where humans introduced them.

6.) California voters’ support for a contentious $52 billion transportation package dubbed the “Gas Tax” is growing with under six weeks before Election Day.

Vernal Pool Fairy Shrimp (Photo via U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sacramento office)

7.) A California landowner scored a major court victory Wednesday when a federal judge ruled that the government wrongly designated 56 acres of its land as critical habitat for the Riverside fairy shrimp.

West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Robin Davis enters the Supreme Court Chambers to announce her retirement before a news conference in the Supreme Court Chambers in Charleston, W. Va., on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018. (Craig Hudson /Charleston Gazette-Mail via AP)

8.) A former West Virginia Supreme Court justice who resigned in August after being impeached by the state’s House of Delegates, sued the state on Wednesday claiming lawmakers had violated her constitutional rights to free speech and due process.

Science

9.) Half of the world’s killer whale populations could collapse in the next century due to the buildup of toxic PCBs, and widespread chemical contamination means only killer whales living near the Arctic and the Antarctic will be left alive according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science.

International

10.) The thousands of asylum-seekers who cross the Mediterranean Sea each year in dinghies and boats enter a legal, and all-too-often deadly, black hole when they set sail from Africa for Europe, legal scholars say.

No longer interested in emails from Courthouse News? Please click here to unsubscribe.

%d bloggers like this: