Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including secret documents from the George W. Bush White House taking immediate refocus as the Senate began its third day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh; the Senate confirmed eight of President Donald Trump’s nominees to federal district courts with minimal pushback; the Trump administration announces it is abandoning a longstanding court settlement that limits how long immigrant children can be kept locked up, and it is proposing new regulations that would let the government detain families until their immigration cases are decided; attorneys for the man accused of mowing down New Yorkers in a 2017 truck attack argue that President Donald Trump’s repeated calls to have their client executed taint his chances of a fair trial; a new study says it’s a good bet the year after a rainy season someone is going to get bit by a rattlesnake in California; although Myanmar is not party to the treaty that established the International Criminal Court, a panel of ICC judges rules the court has jurisdiction over the country’s alleged deportation of Rohingya Muslims, and more.

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National

After more than an hour of delay over procedural questions, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, waits to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the third day of his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) Secret documents from the George W. Bush White House took immediate refocus Thursday as the Senate began its third day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

An American flag flies on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Monday, Sept. 3, 2018, as the Senate prepares for the confirmation hearing of President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, and the House returns to work for the first time since July 26, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

2.) The Senate confirmed eight of President Donald Trump’s nominees to federal district courts on Thursday with minimal pushback from lawmakers on just two of the president’s picks.

In this June 26, 2018, photo, vehicles leave the Port Isabel Detention Center, which holds detainees of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Los Fresnos, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, file)

3.) The Trump administration said Thursday it is abandoning a longstanding court settlement that limits how long immigrant children can be kept locked up, and it is proposing new regulations that would let the government detain families until their immigration cases are decided.

In this June 26, 2017, photo, protesters take part in a rally to oppose a new Texas “sanctuary cities” bill that aligns with the president’s tougher stance on illegal immigration, in San Antonio, Texas, outside of the Federal Courthouse. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

4.) A federal judge signaled Wednesday that he will likely block the Trump administration from cutting off grant funds to San Francisco and California for refusing to help detain and deport undocumented immigrants.

In this July 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

5.) Experts appearing before the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday said economic sanctions could deter Russia from interfering in future U.S. elections, but only if there is better coordination between the White House and Congress.

In this Nov. 6, 1988, file photo, Chicago Bears defensive end Richard Dent (95) sacks Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Vinny Testaverde in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game in Chicago. (AP Photo/John Swart, File)

6.) The Ninth Circuit on Thursday revived a class action claiming the National Football League pushed painkillers on hurt athletes to get them back on the field, often causing permanent injuries.

Regional

In this Friday, April 27, 2018 photo, a voter prepares his ballot during early voting at the Hamilton County Government Center in Noblesville, Ind. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)

7.) Facing legal action, Michigan election officials on Thursday certified a ballot measure allowing residents to approve same-day voter registration and no-reason absentee voting.

Law enforcement personnel examine the scene on Nov. 1, 2017, near the World Trade Center memorial where days earlier a Home Depot truck mowed down bicyclists and pedestrians. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

8.) Attorneys for the man accused of mowing down New Yorkers in a 2017 truck attack said Thursday that President Donald Trump’s repeated calls to have their client executed taint his chances of a fair trial.

Loitering teens.

9.) Attorneys for three District of Columbia residents asked the D.C. Circuit court on Wednesday revive a class action challenging the district’s anti-loitering law on the grounds it is impermissibly vague and potentially discriminatory.

Science

A western diamondback rattlesnake.

10.) It’s a good bet the year after a rainy season someone is going to get bit by a rattlesnake in California, according to a study of 20 years of snakebite data released Thursday.

International

Stockholm, Sweden.

11.) It’s Sweden’s turn to reckon with the rise of nationalist, anti-immigrant and anti-European Union sentiment sweeping across Europe. Swedes vote Sunday in national elections and polls show the Sweden Democrats — a right-wing anti-EU party with roots in the neo-Nazi movement — will make significant gains and possibly become the nation’s largest party.

Rohingya Muslim woman Rukaya Begum, who crossed over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, holds her son Mahbubur Rehman, left and her daughter Rehana Bibi, on Oct. 22, 2017, after the government moved them to newly allocated refugee camp areas, near Kutupalong, Bangladesh. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)

12.) Although Myanmar is not party to the treaty that established the International Criminal Court, a panel of ICC judges ruled Thursday that the court has jurisdiction over the country’s alleged deportation of Rohingya Muslims.

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