Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Paul Manafort’s accountant saying while she handled his finances extensively for seven years, the former Trump campaign chairman never told her about the numerous offshore accounts; she later went on to say Manafort was in serious financial trouble after his long-time patrons in Ukraine were driven from power; the Trump administration formally proposes rolling back Obama-era vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards; a Silicon Valley company sues Walmart for $2 billion , claiming the world’s largest retailer stole its trade secrets on “freshness management” technology; voters across Tennessee will cast ballots Thursday in a primary election to determine the candidates for an open U.S. Senate seat and the governor’s office; despite fierce opposition from environmental groups over potential harm to the endangered dugong, a federal judge rules that a military base the U.S. government plans to build in Okinawa, Japan, can move forward, and more.

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National

Paul Manafort’s former bookkeeper Heather Washkuhn, left, walks to the Alexandria Federal Courthouse in Alexandria, Va., Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, to testify at President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Manafort’s tax evasion and bank fraud trial. Washkuhn testified that Manafort kept her in the dark about the foreign bank accounts he was using to buy millions in luxury items and personal expenses. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

1.) Paul Manafort’s accountant handled his finances extensively for seven years, but testified Thursday the former Trump campaign chairman never told her about the numerous offshore accounts he registered around the globe.

A statue adorns the front of the Albert V. Bryan United States Courthouse, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018 in Alexandria, Va., where President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort is on trial facing federal charges of tax evasion and bank fraud. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

2.) Paul Manafort found himself in serious financial trouble in 2016 after his long-time patrons in Ukraine were driven from power, federal prosecutors said Thursday, the third day of the former Trump campaign chairman’s trial on fraud and conspiracy charges.

In this Aug. 1, 2018, photo, cars on the Grand Central Parkway pass LaGuardia Airport in New York. The Trump administration has proposed rolling back tougher Obama-era gas mileage requirements that are set to take effect after 2020. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

3.) The Trump administration on Thursday formally proposed rolling back Obama-era vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards that were intended to nearly double passenger vehicles’ fuel economy and halve their carbon emissions by 2025.

In this April 11, 2018, photo, production workers stack newspapers onto a cart at the Janesville Gazette Printing & Distribution plant in Janesville, Wis.  (Angela Major/The Janesville Gazette via AP)

4.) Pushing back on the Trump administration’s trade war, a California Democrat wants to boost newspapers struggling with exploding production costs in wake of U.S. tariffs on Canadian paper companies.

Regional

(Erin Wall/Associated Press)

5.) A Silicon Valley company sued Walmart for $2 billion Wednesday, claiming the world’s largest retailer stole its trade secrets on “freshness management” technology for reducing food waste.

The longest deadly prison riot in U.S. history, the Lucasville uprising began on Sunday, April 11, 1993, when inmates attacked a guard while returning from the recreation yard.

6.) Several members of the news media, including a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter, argued before the Sixth Circuit on Thursday in hopes of reviving their constitutional claims against the Ohio Department of Correction, which blocked interviews with inmates involved in the 1993 Lucasville prison riot for over 20 years.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore talks to the media as he prepares to vote, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Gallant, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

7.) Attorney Trenton Garmon, known for representing former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore during his controversial U.S. Senate race last year, sued a digital “reputation” manager, saying it failed to bury unflattering media about him.

In this June 20, 2018, photo, Republican GOP gubernatorial candidates, from left, Diane Black, Randy Boyd, Beth Harwell and Bill Lee take part in a debate in Hendersonville, Tenn. The contest to succeed popular term-limited Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has attracted four leading Republicans who have put some $40.2 million of their own money into the race and have spent a record $45.7 million total. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP, File)

8.) Voters across Tennessee will cast ballots Thursday in a primary election to determine the candidates for an open U.S. Senate seat and the governor’s office, two important positions for influencing federal and state judicial systems.

The Valero Benicia Refinery in Benicia, Calif., is seen here on July 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)

9.) Two clean water cases involving coal-fired power plants in Kentucky and Tennessee, and their impact on the surrounding environment, were argued before the Sixth Circuit on Thursday.

International

A dugong and calf. (Nick Hobgood via Wikipedia)

10.) Despite fierce opposition from environmental groups over potential harm to the endangered dugong, a federal judge ruled Wednesday that a military base the U.S. government plans to build in Okinawa, Japan, can move forward.

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