Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including advocates for dispensing with partisan gerrymandering feeling a renewed sense of purpose in North Carolina and in statehouses across the country; the long-awaited trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is now just hours away; Sen, Rand Paul announces he will support Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh despite misgivings about the judge’s views on surveillance and privacy issues; wildlife advocates bring a lawsuit to ensure federal protection of the scarlet macaw; slightly cooler temperatures and slackening winds helped firefighters in California over the weekend, though the nearly 20 wildfires charring the Golden State may be just the beginning of a long, brutal and deadly fire season; lawyers in Serbia go on strike to protest the weekend killing of a prominent defense lawyer who represented former President Slobodan Milosevic and mafia figures, and more.

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National

The Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)

1.) Even with two inconclusive decisions from the Supreme Court last month in cases that could have cleared a legal path to ending partisan gerrymandering, a renewed challenge in North Carolina and a turn to the states could give advocates more options going forward.

In this Feb. 14, 2018, photo, Paul Manafort leaves the federal courthouse in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

2.) The trial of Paul Manafort is not about Donald Trump nor is it directly about possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin but it is the first time a member of the president’s campaign inner-circle faces a judge and jury stemming from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s year-long investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

President Donald Trump greets Judge Brett Kavanaugh his Supreme Court nominee, in the East Room of the White House, Monday, July 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

3.) Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., announced Monday that he will support Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh despite misgivings about the judge’s views on surveillance and privacy issues.

Maria holds her 4-year-old son Franco after he arrived at the El Paso International Airport Thursday, July 26, 2018 in El Paso, Texas. The two had been separated for over six weeks after being entering the country. (Ruben R. Ramirez/The El Paso Times via AP)

4.) Attorneys for young immigrants separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border claim in a new federal class action that the government is deporting the now-reunified families without fully processing the children’s asylum claims.

With credit to Tony Silva, the nonprofit Friends of Animals included this photo of the scarlet macaw subspecies Ara macao cyanoptera in a complaint filed on July 27, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

5.) Highlighting threats that the brilliantly colored parrot faces from the pet trade and deforestation, wildlife advocates brought a lawsuit to ensure federal protection of the scarlet macaw.

Regional

The Carr Fire burns along Highway 299 in Shasta, Calif., on Thursday, July 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

6.) Slightly cooler temperatures and slackening winds helped firefighters in California over the weekend, though the nearly 20 wildfires charring the Golden State may be just the beginning of a long, brutal and deadly fire season.

This composite image shows panels of Adam and Eve painted c. 1530
by German Renaissance master Lucas Cranach the Elder. (Norton Simon Art Foundation)

7.) A pair Renaissance paintings stolen by Nazis and returned to the Netherlands after World War II will remain with the Norton Simon Museum of Art in Pasadena, California, after the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday it has no power to invalidate an act of the Dutch government.

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8.) Attorneys for a school groundskeeper suing Monsanto over his terminal lymphoma suggested to a California jury Friday that the agrichemical company submitted fraudulent cancer data to U.S. regulators so it could sell its Roundup weed killer, against court orders barring testimony on the topic.

In this July 23, 2018, photo, the duck boat that sank in Table Rock Lake in Branson, Mo., is raised. (Nathan Papes/The Springfield News-Leader via AP, File)

9.) Family members of victims filed a $100 million federal lawsuit Sunday against the owners and operators of a defective duck boat that sank and dragged 17 people to their deaths at the bottom of a Missouri lake less than two weeks ago.

International

In this June 27, 2001 photo, former Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic’s lawyers Dragoslav Ognjanovic, center, and Zdenko Tomanovic, right, address news media after the team visited imprisoned Milosevic in Belgrade. Serbian police say that Ognjanovic was killed late on Saturday, July 28, 2018 outside his home in Belgrade, the Serbian capital. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, file)

10.) Lawyers in Serbia went on strike Monday for a week to protest the weekend killing of a prominent defense lawyer who represented former President Slobodan Milosevic and mafia figures.

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