Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announcing that a dozen Russian military officers have been indicted in connection with interference in the 2016 presidential election and the hacking of the Democratic National Committee; a nonprofit that serves as an advocate for the parents of children with disabilities sues Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for delaying a regulation intended to support black and Hispanic children with disabilities; a state judge refuses to permit a cancer-risk expert to testify about the amount of exposure to the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer California the has been determined to causes cancer; the Fifth Circuit rules a Texas policeman’s decision not to call off his K-9 as it bit into a surrendering suspect’s calf was not excessive force because the man had a knife within reach;Big Brother Watch, a London-based civil liberties group, is seeking to stop police in Britain from deploying cameras that scan faces in public spaces and match them in real-time to the faces of wanted criminals, and more.

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National

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks during a news conference at the Department of Justice, Friday, July 13, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

1.) Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said Friday that a dozen Russian military officers have been indicted in connection with interference in the 2016 presidential election and the hacking of the Democratic National Committee.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, left, joined by Education Department Budget Service Director Erica Navarro, testifies on May 24, 2017, before the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies subcommittee hearing on the Education Department’s fiscal 2018 budget. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

2.) A nonprofit that serves as an advocate for the parents of children with disabilities sued the Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Thursday for delaying a regulation intended to support black and Hispanic children with disabilities.

This undated photo shows Emmett Louis Till, a 14-year-old black Chicago boy, who was kidnapped, tortured and murdered in 1955 after he allegedly whistled at a white woman in Mississippi. (AP Photo, File)

3.) The U.S. Department of Justice has reopened the 63-year-old case of Emmett Till, the black teenager whose brutal murder in 1955 helped trigger the civil rights movement.

Regional

4.) An activist blogger challenging Washington state’s cyberstalking law prohibiting actions that harass, intimidate, torment or embarrass people asked the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday to revive his free speech claims.

In this photo taken Aug. 4, 2009, a crop duster sprays a field of crops just outside Headland, Ala. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)

5.) A state judge on Thursday refused to permit a cancer-risk expert to testify about the amount of exposure to the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weed killer California has determined causes cancer in the first-ever trial over the herbicide’s carcinogenicity.

Facial cleansing performed by a dermatologist. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)
6.) Doctors claims in an antitrust class action that the American Board of Medical Professions is conspiring to reduce public access to a simple skin cancer procedure, by requiring specialty certification for the outpatient surgery.
U.S. District Judge Sidney Fitzwater dismissed Escobar’s lack-of-warning claim, but refused to dismiss his claim that Montee had improperly delayed pulling Bullet off after it was clear Escobar had given up his weapon and was not resisting arrest.
This photo, provided in New York by the U.S. Attorney’s office, Friday, July 13, 2018, shows “Untitled” by modern artist Robert Motherwell. (U.S. Attorney’s Office via AP)

8.) A 1967 abstract painting by Robert Motherwell, stolen by a moving company employee in the 1970s, was returned to the artist’s foundation Thursday following an FBI investigation.

Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, stole a French merchant ship and renamed it Queen Anne’s Revenge.

9.) The Fourth Circuit held Tuesday that North Carlina is immune from being sued by a flimmaker who accused the state of using his copyrighted images of Blackbeard’s pirate ship while it was being salvaged off the Carolina coast.

International

Big Brother.

10.) Police in Britain are testing cameras that scan faces in public spaces and match them in real-time to the faces of wanted criminals. On Friday, Big Brother Watch, a London-based civil liberties group, said it would seek to stop the use of these cameras, lest Britain become a surveillance state, like China.

 

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