Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the federal government saying it needs more time to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border despite a federal judge’s order last week setting a 30-day deadline; word the FBI agent removed from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigative team because of derogatory text messages about President Donald Trump will speak publicly to a pair of committees next week; Leandra English, deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announces that she is leaving the agency and will end her legal quest to head the agency; the Wisconsin Supreme Court orders Marquette University to reinstate a political-science professor who rankled his colleagues with a blog post criticizing liberal speech policing; in just 8 days, what started as a barbecue pit fire in southeastern Colorado has grown to 103,000 acres, making the Spring Creek wildfire the third largest in state history, and more.

Sign up for CNS Nightly Brief, a roundup of the day’s top stories delivered directly to your email Monday through Friday.

National

Sirley Silveira Paixao, right, an immigrant from Brazil seeking asylum, hugs her Chicago based attorney Britt Miller, after a hearing where a federal judge ordered the release of her 10-year-old son Diego from immigration detention, Thursday, July 5, 2018, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Annie Rice)

1.) The federal government says it needs more time to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border despite a federal judge’s order last week setting a 30-day deadline.

In this May 7, 2008, image from video provided by C-SPAN, Raymond Kethledge testifies during his confirmation hearing for the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court on Capitol Hill in Washington. (C-SPAN via AP)

2.) Reportedly a finalist to take Justice Anthony Kennedy’s seat on the Supreme Court, Sixth Circuit Judge Ray Kethledge has earned a reputation as an experienced judge who could receive a modicum of bipartisan support if President Donald Trump calls his name next week.

Peter Strzok, center, the FBI agent facing criticism following a series of anti-Trump text messages, walks to a deposition before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

3.) The FBI agent removed from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigative team because of derogatory text messages about President Donald Trump will speak publicly to a pair of committees next week.

In this March 8, 2018, photo, Jason Maloni, left, former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s spokesman, left, walks with Paul Manafort, center, as they leave the Alexandria Federal Courthouse after an arraignment hearing in Alexandria, Va. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

4.) President Trump’s embattled ex-campaign chair Paul Manafort asked for a court order Friday waiving his right to appear in an Alexandria, Virginia federal court except for his upcoming trial and any potential sentencing.

Leandra English, left, the deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, meets with Senate Democratic leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) in November. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)
5.) Leandra English, deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Friday that she is leaving the agency and will end her legal quest to head the agency.

Regional

Coors Field, home of the Major League Baseball team the Colorado Rockies. (Chris Marshall/CNS)

6.) In the second of a two-part series, Courthouse News’ western bureau chief visits Denver, a city in the midst of an economic and housing boom after reporting from stable if staid Cheyenne, Wyoming.

The Google mobile phone icon. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

7.) Despite its promise to stop scanning emails for advertising purposes, Google let outside developers access and read millions of users’ private emails without consent, an Ohio man claims in a new class action.

Marquette University professor John McAdams speaks at a May 2, 2016, news conference in Milwaukee. (Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP, File)

8.) The Wisconsin Supreme Court ordered Marquette University on Friday to reinstate a political-science professor who rankled his colleagues with a blog post criticizing liberal speech policing.

An issue of Time magazine on a newsstand, November 16, 2017. (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan)

9.) A federal judge gave preliminary approval Thursday to Time Inc. in a class action of its alleged sale of magazine subscriber data.

Firefighters battle a wildfire burning in Guinda, Calif., Sunday, July 1, 2018. Evacuations were ordered as dry, hot winds fueled a wildfire burning out of control Sunday in rural Northern California, sending a stream of smoke some 75 miles (120 kilometers) south into the San Francisco Bay Area. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

10.) In just 8 days, what started as a barbecue pit fire in southeastern Colorado has grown to 103,000 acres, making the Spring Creek wildfire the third largest in state history.

Demonstrators rally in support of net neutrality outside a Verizon store in New York on Dec. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

11.) Two weeks after promising to pull his net neutrality bill after a California state Assembly committee stripped key protections, a state senator on Thursday announced a breakthrough in negotiations on the stalled landmark legislation.

International

A migrants stands outside a building after being evicted by police in Rome, Thursday, July 5, 2018. Over 100 migrants, most of them refugees, were evicted from a squatted building in Rome. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

12.) France’s Constitutional Council has issued a decision in the case of a farmer convicted for helping migrants who entered the country illegally, saying “fraternity” is a principle “of constitutional value” and should not be prosecuted.

%d bloggers like this: