Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a divided Supreme Court upholding President Donald Trump’s so-called travel ban and Justice Sonia Sotomayor skewering the majority for turning a blind eye to what she called clear discrimination against Muslims; despite President Trump’s executive order to stop separating families at the border, it’s unclear where, how, or if families will be reunited with 2,300 children; police arrest priests, reverends, rabbis and other members of the faith community outside a California courthouse in downtown Los Angeles over a show of civil disobedience against the Trump administration’s immigration policies; California is on the verge of creating a first-of-its-kind safety net for marijuana retailers to deposit cash gleaned from legal pot sale; a federal judge rules San Francisco and Oakland cannot hold five of the planet’s largest oil companies liable for climate change; the European General Court backs the government of France on Tuesday in its challenge to the trademark registration of a travel company called France.com, and more.

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National

Protesters hold up signs and call out against the Supreme Court ruling upholding President Donald Trump’s travel ban outside the the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

1.) As the Supreme Court upheld President Donald Trump’s so-called travel ban 5-4 Tuesday, Justice Sonia Sotomayor skewered the majority for turning a blind eye to what she called clear discrimination against Muslims.

2.) Despite President Trump’s executive order to stop separating families at the border, it’s unclear where, how, or if families will be reunited with 2,300 children, and where they and new arrivals will be detained under the crackdown on families.

Rev. Richard Estrada, right, joins fellow clergy members during a protest of the Trump administration’s immigration policies in downtown Los Angeles. (Nathan Solis/CNS)

3.) Police arrested priests, reverends, rabbis and other members of the faith community outside a California courthouse in downtown Los Angeles on Tuesday over a show of civil disobedience against the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Erin Matson is co-founder of ReproAction, a women’s health care advocacy organization. Matson stood for her cause outside the Supreme Court on June 25, 2018, in anticipation of a ruling in a case of disclosure requirements California enforces against unlicensed pregnancy-crisis centers. (BRANDI BUCHMAN, Courthouse News Service)

4.) The Supreme Court voted 5-4 Tuesday to strike down a California law that puts different disclosure requirements on pregnancy centers depending on the status of their licenses.

Paul Manafort arrives at Federal Court in Washington on June 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

5.) A federal judge in Virginia on Tuesday evening rejected a move by President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman to have charges brought against him by the special counsel in the Russia investigation thrown out.

Michael Cohen arrives to court in New York, on May 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

6.) A federal judge gave the Trump Organization an extra week Tuesday to review files that the FBI seized from the president’s embattled attorney, Michael Cohen.

Emma Coronel, right, wife of Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, leaves federal court in Brooklyn with her daughters on June 26, 2018. The upcoming trial of Guzman could get moved from Brooklyn to Manhattan. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

7.) Saying that the drug lord’s Brooklyn trial three months from now will unnecessarily feed a public spectacle, attorneys for Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman fought Tuesday to have the case moved.

Regional

The Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco skyline from the Marin Headlands above Sausalito, Calif. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

8.) San Francisco and Oakland cannot hold five of the planet’s largest oil companies liable for climate change, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Darrin Old Coyote, then chairman of the Crow Tribe, leads riders past Veterans Park as Crow Tribe members gather for the inaugural parade in Crow Agency, Mont. in Dec. 3, 2012. (Larry Mayer /The Billings Gazette via AP, File)

9.) Montana’s Crow Indian Tribe may have to repay up to $14.5 million for highway construction on its reservation because the federal government says the tribe cannot find the receipts for the project.

In this May 25, 2018, photo prices for the three grades of gasoline light up the pump at a Shell station in southeast Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

10.) California voters will get the chance to ax a gas tax intended to pay for long-term highway maintenance and infrastructure projects after a repeal measure qualified for the November ballot on Monday.

A customer purchases marijuana at Harborside marijuana dispensary on Jan. 1, 2018, in Oakland, Calif. Starting today recreational marijuana can be sold legally in California. (AP Photo/Mathew Sumner)

11.) California is on the verge of creating a first-of-its-kind safety net for marijuana retailers to deposit cash gleaned from legal pot sales.

International

12.) Italy’s coastlines are among the most famous and beloved in the world, and the reason why tourists flock with abandon to places like Monopoli, a walled city on the Adriatic Sea each summer. But Monopolitan fishermen and others worry that that government’s new plans to allow offshore drilling could ruin their livelihood and the tourism from which so many coastal residents make their living.

Seine river and Eiffel Tower, seen from Tour Saint Jacques. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

13.) The European General Court backed the government of France on Tuesday in its challenge to the trademark registration of a travel company called France.com.

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