Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the United States withdrawing from the United Nations Human Rights Council, one day after that organization’s chief slammed U.S. immigration policy as “unconscionable”; a federal judge finding Kansas’ voter ID law unconstitutional and sanctioning Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, ordering him to take additional legal education classes; a former Senate intelligence staffer indicted as part of the government’s leak probe claims the president’s remarks about him impinge on his right to a fair trial; California lawmakers advance reforms that would restrict the use of deadly force by law enforcement and make it easier for prosecutors to charge officers who abuse it; California’s primary turnout recorded a sharp increase this month, boosted by an infusion of Latino voters in Southern California and a new voting system in five counties; researchers at Georgia Tech say they may have found viable alternatives to traditional lithium battery construction; the EU General Court rules far-right French leader Marine Le Pen must reimburse the European Parliament for the cost of an assistant’s six-year employment, and more.

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National

United Nations Security Council on the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. (Photo by Neptuul via Wikipedia Commons)

1.) The United States withdrew from the United Nations Human Rights Council on Tuesday, one day after that organization’s chief slammed U.S. immigration policy as “unconscionable.”

The seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

2.) A former CIA employee who has been in jail for months on child-porn charges was hit with a superseding indictment Monday night related to the 2017 leak of the agency’s hacking tools.

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters at the White House, Friday, June 15, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

3.) The former Senate intelligence staffer indicted as part of the government’s leak probe claimed in a court filing Tuesday that the president’s remarks about him impinge on his right to a fair trial.

The Walt Disney Co. logo appears on a screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Aug. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

4.) Disney and other major film studios cannot dodge lawsuits claiming they used stolen technology to create lifelike animated characters in top-grossing films like “Beauty and the Beast,” a federal judge ruled Monday.

This May 24, 2016, photo shows Xerox copiers at a store in North Andover, Mass. Top shareholder Darwin Deason seeks to block a proposed merger with camera company Fujifilm. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

5.) Fujifilm is blaming the collapse of its merger with print and copy giant Xerox on the whims of activist investors Darwin Deason and Carl Icahn and has asked a court to award it more than $1 billion in damages.

Regional

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach speaks during a rally in Topeka, Kan. (AP Photo/Mitchell Willetts, File)

6.) A federal judge found Kansas’ voter ID law unconstitutional Monday and sanctioned Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, ordering him to take additional legal education classes.

7.) At the urging of families of Californians killed by law enforcement, lawmakers on Wednesday advanced reforms that would restrict the use of deadly force and make it easier for prosecutors to charge officers who abuse it.

Staffers inspect and prepare ballots for tabulation at the Department of Elections in San Francisco on June 8, 2018. Elections officials have tens of thousands of ballots left to count in a tight San Francisco mayor’s race. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

8.) Boosted by an infusion of Latino voters in Southern California and a new voting system in five counties, California’s primary turnout recorded a sharp increase this month.

9.) The Seventh Circuit ruled that a dairy conglomerate cannot continue its $30 million advertising campaign saying its cheeses are safer than competitors’ products just because its cows do not consume a hormone supplement approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Science

Matthew Boebinger, a graduate student at Georgia Tech, and Matthew McDowell, an assistant professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Materials Science and Engineering, used an electron microscope to observe chemical reactions in a battery-simulated environment. (Rob Felt/Georgia Tech)

10.) The mineral resources needed to make batteries could become strained as global demand rises, but researchers at Georgia Tech say they may have found viable alternatives to traditional lithium battery construction.

International

French far right leader Marine Le Pen attends a May Day meeting, in Nice, south of France. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, file)

11.) Far-right French leader Marine Le Pen must reimburse the European Parliament for the cost of an assistant’s six-year employment, the EU General Court ruled Tuesday.

12.) The EU’s top court scolded Belgium on Tuesday for ordering the removal of an immigrant while he was still appealing for refugee status.

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