Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including two political gerrymandering cases that stoked voter passions across the United States fizzling on procedural grounds at the Supreme Court; the justices also held that the existence of probable cause for the arrest of a Florida gadfly at a city counsel meeting does not bar his pursuit of a First Amendment retaliation claim against the body; about 2,000 people spent Father’s Day in the tiny Texas town of Tornillo chanting and marching against the opening of a temporary shelter for immigrant children separated from their parents under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy; two California Democrats crafting “gold standards” in net neutrality laws said they will amend and combine their bills before a vote this week in the Legislature; a new study finds warning labels with graphic images linking sugary drink consumption with tooth decay, Type 2 diabetes and obesity appear to reduce purchases of the drinks more effectively than calorie counts or text warnings; European leaders are quarreling, and clamoring for a solution, over what to do with the flow of refugees and immigrants fleeing war-torn and impoverished nations and arriving at Europe’s borders, and more.

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National

The Supreme Court Building is seen in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) Two political gerrymandering cases that stoked voter passions across the United States fizzled on procedural grounds Monday at the Supreme Court.

Supreme Court Justices Anthony Kennedy, left, and Stephen Breyer, right, walk with Chief Justice John Robert during a procession at Harvard Law School. (Steven Senne / Associated Press)

2.) The Supreme Court on Monday approved a federal judge’s refusal to grant a drug dealer’s request for a proportional sentence reduction without explanation, finding that the judge’s awareness of the case record allowed for his use of a barebones form order.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks during an appearance at Brown University’s Pizzitola Sports Center Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, in Providence, R.I. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

3.) Finding that a small miscalculation qualifies as a grave error when it comes to criminal sentencing, the U.S. Supreme Court handed a 7-2 reversal Monday to an immigrant who re-entered the United States illegally.

The decision was a second Supreme Court victory for Fane Lozman, who calls himself “a persistent and tenacious underdog.” (Jessica Gresko/Associated Press)

4.) The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday held that the existence of probable cause for the arrest of a Florida gadfly at a city counsel meeting does not bar his pursuit of a First Amendment retaliation claim against the body.

Regional

Protesters wait near the port of entry in Tornillo, Texas on Sunday, about a half mile from where a temporary shelter for immigrant children has been set up. (Photo by Natalie Krebs/CNS)

5.) About 2,000 people spent Father’s Day in the tiny Texas town of Tornillo chanting and marching against the opening of a temporary shelter for immigrant children separated from their parents under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy.

Former Time magazine Editor in Chief Norman Pearlstine speaks at a conference in Grapevine, Texas. The Los Angeles Times says Pearlstine has been named its new executive editor. (AP Photo/Rex C. Curry,File)

6.) The Los Angeles Times will have a new owner starting on Monday as biotech billionaire Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong finalizes his $500 million purchase, and later this month the whole operation – newsroom and all – will start a new chapter by moving out of its downtown headquarters.

7.) Federal prosecutors scaled back corruption language Monday as they kicked off the much-awaited trial over alleged bid-rigging in the Buffalo Billion economic-investment program.

8.) Two California Democrats crafting “gold standards” in net neutrality laws said Monday they will amend and combine their bills before a vote this week in the Legislature.

California State Rep. Josh Newman speaks from the Senate floor on June 11 after he was recalled by voters in his district.

9.)  More than a week after Election Day in California the campaign signs have come down in the city of Fullerton, where voters recalled their state representative over his support of a 12-cent-per-gallon gas tax.

The Denver Post building in downtown Denver. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

10.) Former Denver Post reporters and editors have launched a new publication after the newspaper’s hedge fund owner rocked the newsroom with layoffs.

Science

An overweight person eating lunch. (Kirsty Wigglesworth, Associated Press)

11.) Warning labels with graphic images linking sugary drink consumption with tooth decay, Type 2 diabetes and obesity appear to reduce purchases of the drinks more effectively than calorie counts or text warnings, a new study finds.

In this Tuesday, June 5, 2018 photo, steam rises in the air from the brown coal power plant Schwarze Pumpe in the Lusatia, (Lausitz) area in Germany. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

12.) Worldwide investments in renewable energy need to dramatically overtake investments in fossil fuels as early as 2025 to meet United Nations climate-change goals, according to new research.

Research & Polls

A title card still from the April 4, 1968 edition of the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite, the evening of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

13.) In a media study where a quarter of participants struggled to separate fact and opinion, researchers found that making the distinction came easier to those who are politically informed, tech-savvy and trusting of national news outlets.

International

People gather to stage a protest after the rescue ship Aquarius has been stuck since Saturday in international waters off the coast of Italy and Malta, both of which have refused it entry, in Turin, Italy, Tuesday, June 12, 2018. (Alessandro Di Marco/ANSA via AP)

14.) European leaders are quarreling, and clamoring for a solution, over what to do with the flow of refugees and immigrants fleeing war-torn and impoverished nations and arriving at Europe’s borders.

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