Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a divided U.S. Supreme Court ruling 5-4 that Ohio’s method of pruning its voter rolls comports with federal law; but in a rare tie, the high court left intact an order expected to cost Washington billions of dollars after Native American tribes contested culvert work that blocked fish migration; the justices then went on to rule a Minnesota law that automatically revokes a former spouse’s life insurance beneficiary designation does not violate the U.S. Constitution’s contracts clause; a secretly recorded audio allegedly reveals Georgia’s lieutenant governor and gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle acknowledging that he backed a controversial education bill he to block a primary opponent from receiving millions of dollars from a super PAC; a new study suggests rising global temperatures will lead to considerable spikes in the variability of annual corn yields by the end of the century; Italy’s new right-wing interior minister Matteo Salvini is keeping to his hard-line campaign promises and has begun to close his country’s borders to refugees, and more.

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National

People rally outside of the Supreme Court in opposition to Ohio’s voter roll purges in Washington on Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

1.) Challengers said the process blocked more than 7,500 qualified Ohioans from voting in the 2016 election, but the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Monday that the state’s method of pruning its voter rolls comports with federal law.

The top-left image in this composite shows a culvert that blocked fish passage at Gamble Creek, which flows into Port Gamble, Washington. The state Transportation Department replaced the barrier culvert in 2016 (right), restoring access to over 5 miles of habitat for chum and coho salmon (bottom), steelhead, sea run cutthroat and resident trout. (Images via WDOT and the city of Yakima)

2.) An unusual tie Monday at the Supreme Court has left intact an order expected to cost Washington billions of dollars after Native American tribes contested culvert work that blocked fish migration.

U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco. (Photo courtesy the U.S. Justice Department)

3.) The Supreme Court invited the U.S. solicitor general on Monday to weigh in on whether a $10.2 billion judgment against Sudan was properly reduced.

The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, Friday, April 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

4.) Siding with the adult children of a deceased Minnesota man, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that a state law that automatically revokes a former spouse’s life insurance beneficiary designation does not violate the U.S. Constitution’s contracts clause.

Lindsay Chestnut of Baltimore holds a sign that reads “I like My Internet Like I Like my Country Free & Open” as she protests near the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

5.) Monday marks the end of net neutrality, the Obama-era policy that required internet service providers to treat all internet traffic as equal.

Regional

Isabelle Franz of Brea in Southern California poses with her “I Voted” sticker outside the Brea Community Center. The Golden State is holding its primary election on Tuesday, June 5, 2018. (Nathan Solis/CNS)

6.) Before results started trickling in from California’s primary election last week, cable news hosts and national media relentlessly primed viewers about the ensuing chaos about to be sparked by the state’s unusual voting process. But a funny thing happened the morning after the election: both major parties claimed victory.

Democratic candidate for Georgia Governor Stacey Abrams waves to supporters after speaking at an election-night watch party Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

7.) A secretly recorded audio allegedly reveals Georgia’s lieutenant governor and gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle acknowledging that he backed a controversial education bill he described as “bad public policy” to block an opponent in the Republican primary from receiving millions of dollars from a super PAC.

In this Jan. 23, 2018, file photo, immigration advocates hold a rally on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

8.) Facing the prospect of conflicting injunctions ordering it to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and keep it going, the Department of Justice on Friday urged a Texas federal judge not to further complicate the legal battle over DACA.

In this April 26, 2018, photo, Kerrie Dallman, left, president of the Colorado Education Association, jokes with Cary Kennedy, a candidate for the Democratic nomination to run for Colorado’s governorship, during a teacher rally in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

9.) Colorado’s primary elections will be open to 1.3 million unaffiliated voters for the first time in state history on June 26, leaving campaigns on both sides of the aisle vying for the support of independents.

Science

10.) Rising global temperatures will lead to considerable spikes in the variability of annual corn yields by the end of the century, increasing the likelihood of simultaneous low outputs across several high-producing regions, the National Academy of Sciences reported on Monday.

International

This undated photo released by by French NGO “SOS Mediterranee” on Monday June 11, 2018 and posted on it’s Twitter account, shows migrants about to board the SOS Mediterranee’s Aquarius ship and MSF (Doctors Without Borders) NGOs, in the Mediterranean Sea. (Kenny Karpov/SOS Mediterranee via AP)

11.) Italy’s new right-wing interior minister Matteo Salvini is keeping to his hard-line campaign promises and has begun to close his country’s borders to refugees and immigrants from war-torn and impoverished African and Middle Eastern nations.

The Kremlin in Moscow. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

12.) The U.S. Treasury Department slapped new sanctions on five Russian companies and three Russian individuals Monday for “malign and destabilizing cyberactivities.”

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