Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump claiming on Twitter that Special Counsel Robert Mueller is “meddling” in the upcoming midterm elections; the Trump administration says between 80,000 and 120,000 political prisoners are being held in prison camps in North Korea; a federal judge refuses to halt a $30 billion privacy class action against Facebook as the Ninth Circuit weighs an emergency petition to stay the case; the Supreme Court rules reimbursement of costs and expenses under the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act only applies to government investigations and criminal cases, not private investigations or civil proceedings; a Harvard University study suggests the death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria could be 70 times higher the official numbers; in the first of a four-part series, Courthouse News explores efforts to overturn Florida’s 150-year ban on voting by convicted felons, and more.

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National

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

1.) President Donald Trump claimed Tuesday on Twitter that Special Counsel Robert Mueller is “meddling” in the upcoming midterm elections by investigating his campaign’s possible collusion with Russia.

North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un,  on Nov. 28, 2017, signing what is said to be a document  authorizing a missile test. (KRT via AP Video)

2.) The Trump administration said Tuesday that between 80,000 and 120,000 political prisoners are being held in prison camps in North Korea, most “under horrific conditions” in remote area.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

3.) A federal judge on Tuesday refused to halt a $30 billion privacy class action against Facebook as the Ninth Circuit weighs an emergency petition to stay the case just two days before a crucial class notice deadline.

A cruiser (front) and a sportbike (background). (Photo by Ildar Sagdejev via Wikipedia Commons)

4.) A police officer who pulled the tarp off a parked motorcycle to verify that it was stolen should have first gotten a warrant, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

The Supreme Court in Washington D.C., April 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko, File)

5.) The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Tuesday that reimbursement of costs and expenses under the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act only applies to government investigations and criminal cases, not private investigations or civil proceedings.

Regional

Devin Coleman

6.) In the first of a four-part series, Courthouse News explores a former Florida felon’s efforts to overturn his state’s 150-year ban on voting by convicted felons.

People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. (Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress via AP)

7.) A federal judge on Tuesday dismissed a lawsuit against the city of Charlottesville, Virginia, its police officers, and state police stemming from a white supremacist rally last summer, finding the claims made by the plaintiffs were barred by qualified immunity and legal precedent.

Research & Polls

Thousands of homes suffered varying degrees of damage while large swaths of vegetation were shredded by the hurricane’s violent winds. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

8.) The death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria could be 70 times higher the official numbers, according to a Harvard study released Tuesday.

International

Arenberg Château, part of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, the oldest university in Belgium and the Low Countries. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

9.) Muslims in the Flemish region of Belgium do not face discrimination from new rules mandating that ritual animal slaughter occur only in approved slaughterhouses, Europe’s highest court ruled Tuesday.

10.) A European Court of Justice magistrate on Tuesday urged his colleagues to overturn a German law that bars heirs from demanding their loved one’s unused vacation time in cash.

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