Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Heracles at the center of federal forfeiture proceedings in Southern California; President Donald Trump says his administration is talking to North Korea in the wake of his canceling a planned June summit with leader Kim Jong Un; the Virginia trial for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on multiple counts of bank and tax fraud will be pushed back two weeks; disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein is arraigned on rape and sex-crime charges; the names of judges who used taxpayer dollars to settle sexual harassment and sex discrimination complaints will be made public, thanks to a rule of court clarification passed unanimously by California’s Judicial Council; the United Nations secretary general emphasized Wednesday that President Donald Trump has an obligation to migrant children, and more.

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National

Federal agents say this Roman-era floor mosaic depicting the Greek mythological figures Heracles, Zeus and Aphrodite was smuggled from Syria into Southern California.

1.) Heracles lies at the center of federal forfeiture proceedings in Southern California, after an 18-foot, one-ton ancient mosaic depicting the mythological hero smuggled from war-torn Syria was recovered from a home by federal agents.

President Donald Trump waves while walking away after speaking to the media, as he walks to the Marine One helicopter Friday, May 25, 2018, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. Trump is traveling to Annapolis to address the U.S. Naval Academy graduation ceremonies. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

2.) President Donald Trump said Friday that his administration is talking to North Korea in the wake of his canceling a planned June summit with leader Kim Jong Un, suggesting the meeting could still come off.

Paul Manafort accompanied by his lawyer Kevin Downing, right, arrives at U.S. Federal Court, in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017.( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

3.) The Virginia trial for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on multiple counts of bank and tax fraud will be pushed back two weeks from its previously schedule July 10 start date.

Nominated to serve as a federal judge in Louisiana, Vitter testified on April 11, 2018, before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Vitter works as general counsel for the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

4.) When it came time for Senator Richard Blumenthal to ask questions of U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana nominee Wendy Vitter at her April confirmation hearing, the Connecticut Democrat began with a seemingly simple inquiry about one of the Supreme Court’s most well-known decisions.

5.) The Supreme Court decision legalizing sports betting is barely two weeks old, but leagues that once opposed the paradigm shift have spent months now clamoring for their cut. As states cry extortion, Courthouse News spoke to economists and experts in sports law for their take.

6.) An eight-person jury on Thursday found Samsung should pay Apple over half a billion dollars for infringing three design and two utility patents of the original iPhone, another bump in the years-long war between the tech giants.

Former entertainment mogul Harvey Weinstein, center, arrives at a New York City police station on May 25, 2018, to face criminal charges in a months-long investigation of allegations that he sexually assaulted women. (APPhoto/Andres Kudacki)

7.) Disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein was arraigned Friday morning on rape and sex-crime charges after turning himself in to New York police.

Regional

A roll of stickers awaiting distribution to early voters sits on a table at a check-in station. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

8.) Democratic organizations and activists claim in court that Florida’s 20-year-old “ballot order” law unfairly puts their candidates at a disadvantage by listing Republican candidates first year after year.

Law enforcement officers respond to Santa Fe High School after an active shooter was reported on campus, Friday, May 18, 2018, in Santa Fe, Texas. ( Steve Gonzales/Houston Chronicle via AP)

9.) The parents of a student killed in last week’s Santa Fe High School shooting sued the accused gunman’s parents for $1 million Thursday, blaming them for not securing firearms used in the rampage that left 10 people dead.

10.) Electric automaker Tesla says it has reached a settlement with buyers of its Model S and Model X cars who claimed the vehicles’ autopilot function was dangerous and unusable.

The seal of the Judicial Council of California, the policymaking body of the California courts. (Photo the Judicial Council of California via YouTube)

11.) The names of judges who used taxpayer dollars to settle sexual harassment and sex discrimination complaints will be made public, thanks to a rule of court clarification passed unanimously Thursday by California’s Judicial Council.

An ice sculpture fashioned by protesters, to demonstrate their view of how the company’s policies are affecting the environment, slowly melts outside the Exxon Mobil shareholders meeting in Dallas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

12.) Mulling the fate of two lawsuits seeking to hold Big Oil liable for climate change, a federal judge said Thursday he cannot punish oil companies for producing planet-warming fossil fuels without also considering the benefits of oil and gas.

Pelicans float on the water with an offshore oil platform in the background in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

13.) Just three months after the Trump administration defeathered a 100-year-old bird law, a pipeline operator won permission to clear trees in nesting season. Conservationists brought a federal complaint Thursday to restore the status quo.

International

14.) There’s little indication from looking at it that a pillar in a cemetery in Chattanooga, Tennessee, was erected by representatives of Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II. It bears no swastika. Its inscription in German makes no mention of the Third Reich, a master race or even a message glorifying war, as the Nazis were known to do.

United Nations Security Council on the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. (Photo by Neptuul via Wikipedia Commons)

15.) The day after a U.S. government official told Congress about the nearly 1,500 migrant children of whom authorities here lost track, a spokesman for the United Nations secretary general emphasized Wednesday that President Donald Trump has an obligation to the most vulnerable.

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