Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a federal judge in Washington ruling that special counsel Robert Mueller was working within his authority when he brought charges against President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman; Motown legend Smokey Robinson and a group of songwriters and music industry representatives urging senators to pass a sweeping update to music licensing laws; Gina Haspel secures enough support to win confirmation as President Donald Trump’s CIA director; an animal rights group filed a Freedom of Information Request with the Interior Department Tuesday in a bid to better understanding why it changed a long-standing policy restricting the import of trophies from hunted endangered species; two abortion providers represented by the American Civil Liberties Union sued Iowa claiming its newly enacted fetal-heartbeat law that outlaws abortion in all but the earliest stages of pregnancy is unconstitutional; the World Trade Organization’s highest court on rejects the bulk of a dispute filed by the United States against the European Union over EU states’ financial support of France-based aircraft manufacturer Airbus, and more.

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National

Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves Federal District Court, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

1.) A federal judge in Washington ruled Tuesday that special counsel Robert Mueller was working within his authority when he brought charges against President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman.

A U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper during a training mission at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada. (Department of Defense via Wikipedia Commons)

2.) Two years ago, the U.S. government won the right to keep information about its predator-drone program classified. It went to the Second Circuit on Tuesday to keep a portion of court’s secret ruling redacted.

Smokey Robinson testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

3.) Motown legend Smokey Robinson and a group of songwriters and music industry representatives were in “Sweet Harmony” on Tuesday while urging senators to pass a sweeping update to music licensing laws.

(Screen grab via C-SPAN2)

4.) The Senate on Tuesday confirmed two of President Donald Trump’s nominees to seats on federal appellate courts, one narrowly to the Sixth Circuit and the other to the 10th Circuit by an overwhelming margin.

In this May 2, 2018, photo, CIA Director-nominee Gina Haspel attends the ceremonial swearing in for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the State Department in Washington.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
5.) Gina Haspel secured enough support to win confirmation as President Donald Trump’s CIA director Tuesday after the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark Warner, said he would vote in her favor.
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. (Associated Press)
6.) The ability of those with bad intentions to swap a person’s face or voice in a recording for another is a threat the intelligence community must tackle before the November midterm elections, Senator Marco Rubio, R-Fla., told members of the Senate Intelligence Committee Tuesday.
Elephants use their trunks to smell for possible danger on March 9, 2010, in the Tsavo East National Park, Kenya. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
7.) An animal rights group filed a Freedom of Information Request with the Interior Department Tuesday in a bid to better understanding why it changed a long-standing policy restricting the import of trophies from hunted endangered species.

Regional

8.) People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals took Texas A&M University to federal court Monday, seeking an injunction to stop what it calls social media censorship of its campaign against the school’s research on dogs bred to develop muscular dystrophy.

Leticia Colon de Mejas, CEO and owner of Energy Efficiencies Solutions, talks outside the federal courthouse in Connecticut about a lawsuit she filed against the state on May 15, 2018. (CHRISTINE STUART, Courthouse News Service)

9.) A group of energy-efficiency contractors brought a federal complaint Tuesday against Connecticut, accusing the state of illegally swiping $155 million in ratepayer funds to close last year’s budget deficit.

Pro-choice counter-protesters hold signs supporting a woman’s right to choose abortion, as nearby anti-abortion activists held a rally in front of Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains in Denver.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

10.) Opening a new front in its war with the Trump administration, California joined Planned Parenthood’s fight against a plan that would strip millions in federal funding from family clinics that give advice about birth control.

Planned Parenthood of the Heartland President and CEO Suzanna de Baca, left, and ACLU of Iowa Legal Director Rita Bettis look on during a news conference, Tuesday, May 15, 2018, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

11.) Two abortion providers represented by the American Civil Liberties Union sued Iowa on Tuesday, claiming its newly enacted fetal-heartbeat law that outlaws abortion in all but the earliest stages of pregnancy is unconstitutional.

International

An Airbus A 350 (Photo by Associated Press)

12.) The World Trade Organization’s highest court on Tuesday rejected the bulk of a dispute filed by the United States against the European Union over EU states’ financial support of France-based aircraft manufacturer Airbus.

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