Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a federal judge tossing out former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s civil lawsuit challenging the authority of Special Counsel Robert Mueller; the House Intelligence Committee ends its probe into the 2016 presidential election, saying there is no evidence of collusion between President Donald Trump and Russia; a Texas judge is suspended without pay after being arrested on felony burglary and tampering with government records charges; defending its enemy-combatant designation of a U.S. citizen captured on the Islamic State battlefield, the government told the D.C. Circuit on Friday that courts cannot review its decision to transfer the man from Iraq; in his latest dispatch, Courthouse News’ western bureau chief tells of an early morning wake-up call and subsequent trip through a famed national park, and more.

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National

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrives at federal court in Washington, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

1.) A federal judge on Friday tossed out former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s civil lawsuit challenging the authority of the special counsel who is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., center, standing with Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., left, and Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., right, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

2.) The House Intelligence Committee ended its probe into the 2016 presidential election Friday, concluding there is no evidence of collusion between President Donald Trump and Russia.

Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen speaks during the daily press briefing at the White House, Wednesday, April 4, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
3.) Nepalese nationals allowed into the United States after a catastrophic 2015 earthquake will have to leave by next summer, Homeland Security officials announced Thursday.
4.) More thrilling than any summer blockbuster, a federal judge set a July 5 hearing date for the Democratic National Committee’s wide-ranging conspiracy claims over its digital sabotage before the 2016 election.

Regional

Picnicking near the bison in Yellowstone. (Chris Marshall/CNS)

5.) In his latest dispatch, Courthouse News’ western bureau chief tells of an early morning wake-up call and subsequent trip through a famed national park.

6.) A Texas judge was suspended without pay this week after being arrested on felony burglary and tampering with government records charges, an indictment he calls a “ridiculous” political attack meant to damage him in a runoff election.

Children make signs in Heritage Square in Flagstaff, Ariz. as teachers and supporters wait for the march to begin, April 26. Over $1 billion dollars has been lost to Arizona schools since 2008 after state-level cuts. (Photo credit: Scott Buffon/CNS)

7.) Arizona teachers walked out of their classrooms across the state Thursday to protest years of cuts to education and to place pressure on the state Legislature to raise school salaries and budgets.

The E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
8.) Defending its enemy-combatant designation of a U.S. citizen captured on the Islamic State battlefield, the government told the D.C. Circuit on Friday that courts cannot review its decision to transfer the man from Iraq.
9.) A Pennsylvania family argued before the Third Circuit on Thursday morning that they are entitled to medical monitoring after their drinking water was contaminated by the U.S. Navy.
10.) Saying his vision took Cardi B “from the strip club to the recording studio,” former manager Shaft hit the hip-hop chart-topper with a $10 million federal complaint Thursday.

Science

The opening measures of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata in E Major, Opus 109.

11.) Playing music that is personally meaningful to Alzheimer’s sufferers could help alleviate the anxiety associated with dementia, according to research published Friday in The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Research & Polls

The Capitol is seen before dawn Wednesday after a night of negotiating on the government spending bill, in Washington, March 21, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

12.) Most Americans believe the federal government needs significant changes for it to work today, the Pew Research Center reported Thursday.

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