Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani joining President Donald Trump’s private legal team representing him in the  Russia investigation; the Seventh Circuit upheld a nationwide preliminary injunction blocking U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ attempt to financially punish so-called sanctuary cities; President Donald Trump’s embattled attorney Michael Cohen dropped his defamation lawsuits against BuzzFeed, its editorial team and the intelligence firm that published what became known as the Russian dossier; a New York film company throws down the gauntlet in federal court over rights to footage of the Beatles’ first U.S. concert; one of the most pristine natural reserves in North America is in danger of being despoiled after the Trump administration initiated the process to allow oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, and more.

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National

Then-President-elect Donald Trump, right, and former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani pose for photographs on Nov. 20, 2016, as Giuliani arrives at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

1.) Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is joining President Donald Trump’s private legal team representing him in the  Russia investigation.

Moina Shaiq holds a sign at a rally outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

2.) Citing the need to check the potential “tyranny” of the executive branch, the Seventh Circuit upheld a nationwide preliminary injunction Thursday blocking U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ attempt to financially punish so-called sanctuary cities for refusing to enforce federal immigration laws.

Attorney Michael Cohen in New York. President Donald Trump said Sunday, April 15, 2018, that all lawyers are now “deflated and concerned” by the FBI raid on his personal attorney Cohen’s home and office. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
3.) President Donald Trump’s embattled attorney Michael Cohen dropped his defamation lawsuits against BuzzFeed, its editorial team and the intelligence firm that published what became known as the Russian dossier.
Special Counsel Robert Mueller departs after a closed-door meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee about Russian meddling in the election at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
4.) The Senate Judiciary Committee will move forward on a bill to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller, despite Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s comments that the bill will not get time on the Senate floor.
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, (pictured right). (J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press)
5.) The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday approved six of President Donald Trump’s judicial nominees, including three nominated to seats on federal appellate courts.

Regional

Umbrellas are placed over the statute of the Beatles, during a photocall, on Liverpool’s waterfront, in Liverpool, England, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. The city of Liverpool is getting set to celebrate the half-centenary of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” one of the most influential albums by local heroes The Beatles. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

6.) Over half a century since the start of the British Invasion, a New York film company threw down the gauntlet in federal court Wednesday over rights to footage of the Beatles’ first U.S. concert.

Lance Armstrong during a news conference in Galveston, Texas on April 1, 2012. (Michael Paulsen/Houston Chronicle via AP, File)

7.) Former Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong has agreed to settle a lawsuit with the federal government stemming from his use of performance enhancing drugs while competing for a cycling team the United States Postal Service sponsored, the Justice Department announced Thursday.

This July 12, 2017, file photo shows the cover of an issue of the National Enquirer featuring President Donald Trump at a store in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

8.) A former Playboy Playmate settled with The National Enquirer in a California state court Wednesday, releasing her from a contract agreement that she says blocked her from sharing her story of an alleged affair with Donald Trump.

In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an airplane flies over caribou from the Porcupine Caribou Herd on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

9.) One of the most pristine natural reserves in North America is in danger of being despoiled after the Trump administration initiated the process to allow oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska.

Science

10.) Nearly one-third of U.S. patients who undergo one of 25 common surgeries do not take the opioid painkillers as they were prescribed, the Mayo Clinic reported on Thursday.

Research & Polls

11.) Most Americans say they would prefer tech companies take the lead in stopping the spread of misinformation online instead of the government, even if it would limit their freedom to access and publish information, the Pew Research Center reported Thursday.

International

12.) An EU magistrate soured Thursday on Nestle’s attempt to protect the four-finger shape of Kit Kat bars, finding that the trademark lacked distinctive character.

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