Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg encountering far less good cheer from lawmakers on his second and final day of testimony on Capitol Hill as they subjected him to intense questioning; Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan announces he will not run for re-election; a new report from the Government Accountability Office says Congress needs to revise how coal companies are required to pay for reclamation of land; one of the largest water agencies in Southern California agrees to pay for the bulk of a $16 billion plan to build a pair of water tunnels that will send water from northern parts of the state south; analysis released by the Center for Biological Diversity says oil companies operating in coastal waters off California have violated environmental regulations hundreds of times in just the last three years, and more.

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National

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election and data privacy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

1.) On his second and final day of testimony on Capitol Hill, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg encountered far less good cheer from lawmakers Wednesday as they subjected him to intense questioning over security breaches and even about drug sales occurring on the platform.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., meets with reporters following a GOP strategy session in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

2.) Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will not run for re-election, saying he wants to be more than a “weekend dad” before his children graduate high school.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller departs after a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
3.) Special Counsel Robert Mueller is pushing back at Paul Manafort’s attempts to convince a court to dismiss several bank and tax fraud charges brought against him, saying the former Trump campaign chairman’s arguments lack merit.
President Donald Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen appears in front of members of the media on Sept. 19, 2017, after a closed-door meeting with the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

4.) President Donald Trump has depicted the FBI raid on his attorney’s home as a partisan witch hunt, but the deputy U.S. attorney who likely authorized it is a former Republican donor affiliated with Deutsche Bank.

Wendy Vitter, with her husband, David Vitter, during his election night watch party in Kenner, La. on Nov. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)

5.) President Donald Trump’s nominee for a seat on a federal court in Louisiana told senators on Wednesday her failure to disclose to lawmakers two appearances she made at pro-life events was an innocent oversight.

6.) As America’s coal industry faces a difficult market, a new report from the Government Accountability Office says Congress needs to revise how coal companies are required to pay for reclamation of land.

Regional

The Delta viewed from above Sherman Island, with the Sacramento River above and San Joaquin River below.

7.) One of the largest water agencies in Southern California agreed Tuesday to pay for the bulk of a $16 billion plan to build a pair of water tunnels that will send water from northern parts of the state south, a move some critics say will increase rates for customers and harm the environment.

Immigrant rights advocates speak out against immigration policies of President Donald Trump while placing themselves in mock detention in Albuquerque, N.M., to mark May Day on May 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

8.) A Justice Department lawyer on Wednesday urged a Ninth Circuit panel to tailor a nationwide block on “sanctuary city” funding cuts so it applies to just two jurisdictions in California.

A woman looks at the chalk, charcoal and hot glue on wood painting ‘Chalk or Charcoal’ by Pascale Marthine Tayou in London, Friday, March 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

9.) Attorneys in a seven-year class action lawsuit between a group of California artists and Sotheby’s and Christie’s sparred before a Ninth Circuit panel Tuesday over whether a state law requiring royalties from auction sales is pre-empted by federal copyright law.

Pelicans float on the water with an offshore oil platform in the background in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

10.) Oil companies operating in coastal waters off California have violated environmental regulations hundreds of times in just the last three years, according to an analysis released by the Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday.

Staff Sgt. Kevin Black, 36, of Kenmore, N.Y., of the New York National Guard keeps an eye on a group of suspected illegal immigrants near the Arizona-Mexico border in Sasabe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

11.) California Gov. Jerry Brown complied with the Trump administration’s request for additional National Guard personnel but also took shots at Trump’s immigration policies on Wednesday.

Science

12.) Suppressing peanut allergies – which can be dangerous and occasionally fatal – with a vaccine may be a step closer reality, according to the results of a new study.

 

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