Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort making another attempt have criminal charges brought against him by Special Counsel Robert Mueller thrown out by a federal court; the Supreme Court will dive into partisan gerrymandering Wednesday for the second time in less than six months; fisherman reeled in a temporary victory after a federal court agreed to lift a 10-month stay on a lawsuit seeking to reverse Obama-era protections for the first national marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean; the Seventh Circuit appears unmoved by a conservative challenge to labor laws in Illinois; attorneys ask a federal judge for leniency in sentencing the Turk who flouted sanctions against Iran through a series of multibillion-dollar bank trades, and more.

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National

In this Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, photo, Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves the Federal District Court, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

1.) Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on Tuesday, made another attempt to have criminal charges brought against him by Special Counsel Robert Mueller thrown out by a federal court — but this time the request was filed in Virginia, where he is scheduled to stand trial in July.

In this June 21, 2017, photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

2.) Special Counsel Robert Mueller and attorneys for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort can agree on one thing – any evidence unearthed in discovery should be privy to a protective order.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan. (Patrick Semansky/Associated Press)

3.) The Supreme Court will dive into partisan gerrymandering Wednesday for the second time in less than six months, as a group of Maryland Republicans attempt to show that state lawmakers redrew their congressional district to punish their political affiliation.

In this Oct. 12, 2017, photo, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss preparing for the 2020 Census, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

4.) The government announced Monday night it will include citizenship questions on the 2020 U.S. census, prompting a federal lawsuit that evening from California and threats of other suits by more states.

5.) Fisherman and lobstermen reeled in a temporary victory after a federal court agreed to lift a 10-month stay on a lawsuit which seeks to reverse Obama-era protections for the first national marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean.

In this April 12, 2016, photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the company’s 10-year roadmap during the keynote address at the F8 Facebook Developer Conference in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

6.) Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, according to media reports.

Regional

Demonstrators rally at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois, February 26, 2011. (AP/Seth Perlman)

7.) At a Tuesday hearing, the Seventh Circuit seemed unmoved by a conservative challenge to labor laws in Illinois, one of the last union-friendly states in the Rust Belt, in a lawsuit seeking to legalize local right-to-work ordinances.

A Burlington Electric employee checks the radio frequency of a smart meter in Vermont, which in 2012 became the first state to allow electric customers to refuse smart meters at no added cost. (Associated Press)

8.) With privacy concerns under the national spotlight, the Seventh Circuit wrestled Tuesday with a claim that a Chicago suburb’s smart electricity meters collect too much information about residents in violation of the Fourth Amendment.

Demonstrators who supports keeping Confederate era monuments protest before the Jefferson Davis statue was taken down in New Orleans, Thursday, May 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

9.) New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu will receive the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award in May for his removal of four Confederate statues that were formerly prominently placed around the city, the Kennedy Library Foundation announced Tuesday.

10.)  Aaron Rich, the brother of Seth Rich, the former Democratic National Committee staffer shot in the back while walking home in the nation’s capitol two years ago, sued a handful of media outlets on Monday for slandering him.

Science

A newfound organ, the interstitium, is seen here beneath the top layer of skin, but is also in tissue layers lining the gut, lungs, blood vessels, and muscles. The organ is a body-wide network of interconnected, fluid-filled compartments supported by a meshwork of strong, flexible proteins. (Illustration by Jill Gregory. Printed with permission from Mount Sinai Health System)

11.) Layers within the human body previously believed to be dense, connective tissues have now been identified as an organ, according to a new study that could help scientists understand the spread of cancer within the body.

International

Mehmet Atilla, right, testifies on Dec. 15, 2017, during his trial on corruption charges in New York. (Elizabeth Williams via AP, File)

12.)  Call him “The Banker of Ankara.” Recalling Portia’s plea for Shylock to season justice with mercy in “The Merchant of Venice,” attorneys have asked a federal judge for leniency in sentencing the Turk who flouted sanctions against Iran through a series of multibillion-dollar bank trades.

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