Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort agreeing to waive his right to a speedy trial in one of two criminal cases tied to work he performed for Ukrainian lobbyists; President Donald Trump signs a $1.3 trillion government spending bill Friday afternoon, hours after his surprise declaration that he intended to veto it; California utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric promises to turn off electricity in wildfire-prone areas when wind and other factors could abet the rapid spread of a blaze; the Third Circuit seems inclined to let Catholic nuns intervene in a legal battle between states and the Trump administration over the contraceptive mandate in the federal health care law, and more.

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National

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrives at federal court in Washington, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

1.) Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on Friday agreed to waive his right to a speedy trial in one of two criminal cases tied to work he performed for Ukrainian lobbyists.

President Donald Trump with, Vice President Mike Pence, responds to reporters’ questions in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, March 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

2.) President Donald Trump signed a $1.3 trillion government spending bill Friday afternoon, hours after his surprise declaration that he intended to veto it because it did not address DACA recipients and did not fully fund his proposed border wall.

This image released by the FBI is the wanted posted for 9 Iranians that took part in a government-sponsored hacking scheme that pilfered sensitive information from hundreds of universities, private companies and government agencies. (FBI via AP)

3.) With the Trump administration ratcheting up rhetoric against Iran, U.S. prosecutors charged nine Islamic Revolutionary Guard-linked hackers on Friday with a massive cybercrime spree, involving hundreds of institutions, 31.5 terabytes of data, and $3.4 billion in damages.

Rescue boats fill a flooded street as flood victims are evacuated as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

4.) Hurricane Harvey triggered dozens of toxic releases from Houston chemical plants and refineries, and officials say the public health risks are unknown due to Texas’ industry-friendly rules that left it up to companies to report such incidents.

Regional

Smoke and flames from fire at the Hilton Sonoma Wine Country hotel in Santa Rosa, Calif., Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

5.) California utility giant Pacific Gas & Electric on Thursday promised to turn off electricity in wildfire-prone areas when wind and other factors could abet the rapid spread of a blaze.

6.) A man convicted of asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to pay his debts entertained an incredulous 10th Circuit panel Thursday.

7.) The Environmental Protection Agency has invited governors from across the country to a summit in DC this spring to develop a multi-state strategy to combat pollution from perfluorinated compounds, a group of man-made chemicals linked to increased risk of cancer and developmental problems in children.

Little Sisters of the Poor outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments for their case against the contraception mandate in the federal health care law. (Photo courtesy of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty)

8.) The Third Circuit seemed inclined Friday to let Catholic nuns intervene in a legal battle between states and the Trump administration over the contraceptive mandate in the federal health care law.

 

9.) A superficially simple housing-accommodation case argued Friday at the Third Circuit hinged this morning on an ethereal-like philosophical question: what is necessary?

International

10.) As in 2016, Luxembourg-based officials reported Friday, more than 1,600 cases were brought last year before the European Court of Justice and the General Court of the EU.

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