Nightly Brief

Your Thursday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including John Dowd, one of Donald Trump’s top personal lawyers, stepping down from the president’s legal team; Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg broke his days-long silence in the midst of a data-mining scandal to acknowledge mistakes were made; the California Supreme Court rules that colleges owe their students safety and protection from foreseeable violence in the classroom; a team of biologists and entomologists buzzing with excitement after discovering the enzymes that determine how sensitive honeybees and bumblebees are to a certain pesticide; the European General Court chided EU Parliament for denying full access to meetings of what is known as a “trilogue,” and more.

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National

1.) John Dowd, one of Donald Trump’s top personal lawyers, stepped down Thursday from the president’s legal team just days after calling for an immediate end to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election.

In this June 21, 2017, photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during preparation for the Facebook Communities Summit, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

2.) With his company slapped with a second lawsuit in as many days over a data-mining scandal that likely influenced the 2016 presidential election, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg broke his days-long silence to acknowledge mistakes were made.

3.) Despite overwhelming scientific consensus that heat-trapping carbon emissions are warming the planet, a Big Oil attorney argued in court Wednesday that doubt still lingers as to how much the fossil fuel industry has impacted climate change.

4.) The Seventh Circuit found an Indiana high school’s Christmas Spectacular concert constitutional after the school added Hanukkah and Kwanzaa songs and replaced its live nativity with mannequins.

Regional

5.)  The California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that colleges owe their students safety and protection from foreseeable violence in the classroom, reversing an appeals court’s finding that UCLA did not have a duty to protect a student who was attacked with a knife by a classmate in a chemistry lab.

6.) Recounting nearly a dozen cases of tragedy on New York City’s subway tracks, one woman who had a close call brought a federal class action Wednesday demanding safety reforms.

7.) North Carolina asked the Fourth Circuit on Thursday to dismiss a lower court ruling that said the state pirated stock footage a Virginia company had shot of the 18th Century pirate ship the Queen Anne’s Revenge.

Science

8.) A team of biologists and entomologists are buzzing with excitement after discovering the enzymes that determine how sensitive honeybees and bumblebees are to a certain pesticide, opening the potential to create pest-control substances that aren’t deadly to bees.

Research & Polls

This Oct. 29, 2014 photo, shows the Wall Street subway stop on Broadway, in New York’s Financial District. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

9.) Republicans’ confidence in the state of the national economy has surged since the election of President Donald Trump, the Pew Research Center reported Thursday.

International

10.) Emphatic that provisional legislative proposals are public records too, the European General Court chided EU Parliament on Thursday for denying full access to meetings of what is known as a “trilogue.”

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