Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Fifth Circuit allowing the construction of a pipeline through delicate wetlands to resume in Louisiana; the 11th Circuit upholds the conviction of a Florida man stemming from a warrantless search of his cellphone, holding that such searches do not violate the Fourth Amendment; upcoming judicial elections in California trigger concerns that politics has invaded what should be an impartial and apolitical branch of government; the New York City Police Department being hit with a class action demanding it stop forcing Muslim women to remove their headscarves for mug shots; new research revealing that, on average cities experienced 2.3 more assaults on days when they hosted rallies for then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election campaign, and more.

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National

A cypress swamp in Louisiana, in the lower reaches of the Mississippi River.

1.) Construction of a pipeline through delicate wetlands in Louisiana that was halted last month over the possibility of irreversible harm to the environment can resume, a divided Fifth Circuit panel ruled Thursday.

2.) A divided 11th Circuit on Thursday upheld the conviction of a Florida man stemming from a warrantless search of his cellphone, holding that such searches do not violate the Fourth Amendment.

3.) Sixteen-term New York Democratic Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, known as a champion of equality, died Friday at age 88.

Regional

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Stuart Rice. (Photo courtesy LA County Superior Court)

4.) Midterm judicial elections in California don’t usually attract much publicity, but with Santa Clara County Judge Aaron Persky staring down a recall vote and 17 incumbent judges facing challenges for their seats in June, the upcoming race has triggered concerns that politics has invaded what should be an impartial and apolitical branch of government.

5.) The New York City Police Department was hit with a class action Friday demanding it stop forcing Muslim women to remove their headscarves for mug shots.

In this July 7, 2006 photo, Boston Symphony Orchestra music director James Levine conducts the symphony on its opening night performance at Tanglewood in Lenox, Mass. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)

6.) Blasting what he called the Metropolitan Opera’s “kangaroo court,” conductor James Levine sued the New York cultural institution for firing him over sexual molestation allegations that he describes as tabloid rumor.

Research & Polls

(Britain Eakin, CNS)

7.) New research reveals that, on average, cities experienced 2.3 more assaults on days when they hosted rallies for then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election campaign.

8.) A new study led by a nonprofit journalism group found that more than 90 percent of several top brands of bottled water were contaminated with tiny pieces of plastic.

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