Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Supreme Court ruling that the federal government can intervene in a case brought by Texas and pursue claims New Mexico has used more than its fair share of water from the Rio Grande; U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement filing an appeal challenging a federal judge’s order releasing more than 100 Iraqi nationals; Southern California cities sued an international agency tasked with upholding the Clean Water Act; California’s Judicial Council adopting a statewide framework for courts to protect their data; researchers retracing the chemical steps that lead to the formation of complex hydrocarbons in space, and more.

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National

In this May 27, 2015, photo, the Rio Grande river flows near Mesilla and Bosque State Park, N.M. (Jett Loe /The Las Cruces Sun-News via AP)

1.) The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the federal government can intervene in a case brought by Texas and pursue claims that New Mexico has used more than its fair share of water from a Rio Grande reservoir.

A gasoline pipeline carries gasoline near Lake Charles, Louisiana.
(Associated Press)

2.) The release of documents obtained through a public records request this week underscored conservationists’ suspicion of a close relationship between a pipeline company and government officials.

In this March 6, 2015, photo, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents enter an apartment complex looking for a specific undocumented immigrant convicted of a felony during an early morning operation. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

3.) U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement filed an appeal with the Sixth Circuit challenging a federal judge’s order releasing more than 100 Iraqi nationals who had been languishing in immigration-detention facilities for months.

4.) A dispute involving private cemeteries is headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, after the justices agreed Monday to decide whether a property owner must first exhaust all state court remedies before filing a federal lawsuit asserting an unconstitutional taking of land.

Regional

5.) While Democrats in California tout several issues leading up to the 2018 midterm elections, including immigration, health care, and tax reform, one constant rings louder than all others: opposition to President Donald Trump’s policies, which they hope will be the undoing in several Republican-held districts.

The pier of Imperial Beach (Photo by Kotowski via Wikipedia Commons)

6.) Southern California cities, tired of their beaches and waterways being polluted by sewage entering U.S. waters from Tijuana, Mexico, sued the international agency tasked with upholding the Clean Water Act on Friday.

The seal of the Judicial Council of California, the policymaking body of the California courts. (Photo the Judicial Council of California via YouTube)

7.) After a presentation that could have been titled “How to save your case files from being lost in a disaster,” California’s Judicial Council on Friday adopted a statewide framework for the courts to protect their data.

This courtroom sketch shows former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli, left, seated next to his lawyer Ben Brafman in federal court, Friday Feb. 23, 2018 in New York. (Elizabeth Williams via AP)

8.) A federal judge in Brooklyn ordered convicted fraudster Martin “Pharma Bro” Shkreli to pay $7.36 million Monday for a scheme to defraud investors in his failing hedge funds, and he may also have to give up a Picasso and the only known copy of a secret Wu-Tung Clan album as part of the forfeiture.

9.) Two former attorneys for rap mogul Marion “Suge” Knight were indicted on charges of conspiring to bribe potential witnesses in Knight’s murder case, according to a grand jury indictment unsealed Monday.

Science

An asteroid belt orbits a star in this artist’s rendering. In a new study, experiments at Berkeley Lab explored possible chemical pathways that could form complex hydrocarbons — like those found in some meteorite samples — in space. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

10.) Researchers have reconstructed the chemical steps that lead to the formation of complex hydrocarbons in space, presenting routes to forming 2-D carbon-based nanostructures in a mix of heated gases.

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