Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Senate leadership announcing a two-year bipartisan budget agreement; candidates jostling to replace Governor Jerry Brown detailed their fixes for the nation’s most populous state; families who have lived in the mountains around Roanoke, Virginia for generations are fighting the development of a new pipeline in the area to ensure they are treated fairly during the eminent domain process; ousted Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick tells a court he discussed buying a nonexistent company from Waymo’s lead self-driving engineer to speed his company’s development of the cars; a new study finds plaintiffs in federal sex-discrimination employment lawsuits are more likely to win financial settlements and pretrial rulings if women judges are presiding over their cases, and more.

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National

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves the chamber after announcing an agreement in the Senate on a two-year, almost $400 billion budget deal that would provide Pentagon and domestic programs with huge spending increases, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) Senate leadership on Wednesday announced a two-year bipartisan budget agreement that lifts mandatory caps on government spending that could make it easier for Congress to pass future funding packages.

2.) Echoing the spectacles of totalitarian regimes, President Donald Trump’s plan for a military parade bewildered historians and veterans groups alike Wednesday.

President Donald Trump, accompanied by Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, right, speaks during a meeting with Republican Senators on immigration in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

3.) Lack of cohesion at the Department of Homeland Security is creating vulnerability and some confusion in the national security framework, officials told Congress on Wednesday.

Regional

Republican candidates in San Francisco, from left to right, John Cox, Doug Ose and Travis Allen. Courthouse News photo by Nick Cahill.

4.)  Juggling climate change, environmental policy and California’s mounting housing crisis, candidates jostling to replace Governor Jerry Brown on Tuesday detailed their fixes for the nation’s most populous state.

The valley below Bent Mountain in Virginia. (Photo by Brad Kutner)

5.) Families who have lived in the mountains around Roanoke, Virginia for generations are fighting the development of a new pipeline in the area, not on strictly environmental grounds, but to ensure they are treated fairly during the eminent domain process.

(Via elizabar.com)

6.) Eli Zabar, an heir to one of the royal families of New York City delicatessens, claims in court that his Upper East Side landlord is ousting tenants through a pattern of harassment and neglect.

In this Feb. 26, 2017, photo, then-Uber CEO Travis Kalanick arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, Calif.  (Photo by Evan Agostini/AP, File)

7.) On the second day of a trade-secrets war between Waymo and Uber, ousted Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick said he discussed buying a nonexistent company from Waymo’s lead self-driving engineer to speed his company’s development of the cars.

Science

8.) Ultraviolet radiation at the level scientists believe Earth experienced 252 million years ago during the planet’s largest mass extinction event can temporarily sterilize pine trees, according to a new study that supports the theory that ozone depletion contributed to the die-off.

Research & Polls

9.) Plaintiffs in federal sex-discrimination employment lawsuits are more likely to win financial settlements and pretrial rulings if women judges are presiding over their cases, according to a study to be published in the Journal of Labor Economics.

International

Utrecht, head office Rabobank. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

10.) The California subsidiary of Netherlands-based Rabobank Wednesday pleaded guilty to a single conspiracy charge related to its anti-money laundering program, an agreement in which the bank forfeited over $368 million – the largest financial penalty ever paid in the Southern District of California.

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