Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Senate leadership announcing they are close to reaching a long-term bipartisan budget agreement; New York and nearly a dozen other states sued the Trump administration Tuesday for suspending a 2015 rule that was billed as a long-overdue update intended to improve protections under the Clean Water Act; two separate rulings released by the Ohio Supreme Court dealt a serious blow to the state’s abortion providers; a new satellite-based early warning system could provide accurate information on the size and epicenter of an earthquake moments after it initially occurs, which similar tools often cannot capture, and more.

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National

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., center, and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., left, the vice chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, head to a closed security briefing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

1.) With the House of Representatives prepared to take up a short-term government funding package as early as Tuesday, Senate leadership said they are close to reaching a long-term bipartisan budget agreement.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman speaks at a news conference in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

2.) New York and nearly a dozen other states sued the Trump administration Tuesday for suspending a 2015 rule that was billed as a long-overdue update intended to improve protections to lakes, rivers, and wetlands under the Clean Water Act.

A hashcoin mining machine. (Photo via Wikipedia Commons)

3.) As crytocurrencies flood mainstream investment circles, financial regulators told Congress on Tuesday that multiple agencies are working together on confronting the emerging industry.

In this Monday May 23, 2005 file photo Donald Trump speaks at a press conference in New York to announce the establishment of Trump University. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

4.) Trump University students will finally see their payday, after a Ninth Circuit panel on Tuesday found a federal judge did not abuse his discretion in approving the $25 million settlement and rejecting a single opt-out request made by a Florida attorney.

Regional

(Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta AP)

5.) Two separate rulings released Tuesday by the Ohio Supreme Court dealt a serious blow to the state’s abortion providers, including revoking the medical license of the last abortion provider in the northwest part of the Buckeye State.

6.) Well-known artist Robert Cenedella claims in a $100 million lawsuit that the Met, Whitney, MOMA and other museums mostly show solo exhibitions by artists represented by just five galleries due to close financial ties between the museums and galleries that prevent other artists from getting their work shown.

(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association)

7.) Opening arguments Monday in the criminal trial of a woman accused of smuggling 250 pounds of rare and endangered sea creatures into the United States from Mexico raised questions about what she knew about her boyfriend’s seafood business.

Science

In this photo released by Hualien County Fire Bureau, rescuers are seen entering an building that collapsed onto its side from an early morning earthquake in Hualien County, eastern Taiwan, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018. (Hualien County Fire Bureau via AP)

8.) A new satellite-based early warning system could provide accurate information on the size and epicenter of an earthquake moments after it initially occurs, which similar tools often cannot capture.

International

(Via Wikipedia)

9.) Stomping on Christian Louboutin’s trademark for red-soled shoes, an EU magistrate focused Tuesday on a law that excludes shapes from protection.

Jennifer Robinson, centre left, a lawyer representing Julian Assange, talks to the media outside Westminster Magistrates Court after the court ruled that an arrest warrant against Assange is still valid, in London, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. ( John Stillwell/PA via AP)

10.) Swedish authorities no longer want WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange extradited on sexual-misconduct allegations, but a judge found no reason Tuesday to lift the warrant issued for him in London.

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