Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Chicago’s court clerk appealing a federal district court opinion that ordered contemporaneous access to new electronic filings under the First Amendment. The clerk’s action pushes the issue up to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals; immigration reform set to be introduced Monday by Senators John McCain and Chris Coons drew a swift rebuke from the president for its omission of funding for a wall on the southern border; Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito refused to take up a Pennsylvania redistricting fight, dealing a blow to lawmakers who are on deadline to redraw a congressional map gerrymandered for the GOP; a new study finds that San Diego’s growing immigrant population accounted for a quarter of all contributions to the local economy and paid billions in taxes, and more.

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National

1.) Chicago’s court clerk is appealing a federal district court opinion that ordered contemporaneous access to new electronic filings under the First Amendment. The clerk’s action pushes the issue up to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals.

President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

2.) Immigration reform set to be introduced Monday by Senators John McCain and Chris Coons drew swift rebuke from the president Monday for its omission of funding for a wall on the southern border.

The Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

3.) Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito refused to take up a Pennsylvania redistricting fight Monday, dealing a blow to lawmakers who are on deadline to redraw a congressional map gerrymandered for the GOP.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai answers a question from a reporter after a meeting where commissioners voted to end net neutrality, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

4.) The Federal Communications Commission is expected to publish notice of the end of net neutrality rules in the Federal Register this week, effectively starting the play clock on lawmakers who wish to stop the widely criticized reversal.

Aerial view of the National Renewable Energy (NREL), South Table Mesa campus (STM). (Photo credit: Dennis Schroeder / NREL)

5.) The president will release his proposed 2019 budget early next week, and many expect him to pick up where he left off last year – with hefty blows to renewable energy funding.

Regional

San Diego’s new $556 million courthouse is open for business.

5.) A 73-year-old typewriter and a stuffed marlin joined court files and office furniture in the new $556 million state-of-the-art courthouse in San Diego over the weekend, closing the doors on the 56-year-old asbestos-riddled building that sits on an earthquake fault.

Homeowners in the Midway Beach section of Berkeley Township are fighting a plan by New Jersey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to take part of the land for a protective sand dune project, arguing that what is already there is larger than what the government project would build. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

6.) In a push to open up beaches along the New Jersey Shore, state lawmakers voted unanimously Monday to adopt a law based on centuries-old doctrine from the Roman Empire.

Authorities investigate the scene of a fatal Amtrak train crash in Cayce, South Carolina, on Feb. 4, 2018. At least two were killed and dozens injured. (Tim Dominick/The State)

7.) Federal investigators are scrutinizing a railroad switch that appears to have been locked in the wrong position as the cause of a train collision early Sunday in central South Carolina that left two people dead and up to 116 others injured.

A marijuana bud before harvesting at a rural area near Corvallis, Ore.  (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)
8.)  Oregon’s top federal prosecutor took aim Friday at what he called “massive overproduction” of legal marijuana that he says has leaked out into the black market, attracting drug cartels, causing environmental damage and endangering children.
The Louisiana Governor’s Mansion. (Photo by Sf46 via Wikipedia Commons)
9.) Louisiana Governor John Bel Edward’s office complied with the records law when it turned over no documents pertaining to a records request from environmentalists seeking documents related to a proposed pipeline, a state judge ruled Friday.

Research & Polls

10.)  A new study finds that San Diego’s growing immigrant population accounted for a quarter of all contributions to the local economy and paid billions in taxes.

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