Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including a federal judge ordering Harris County, Texas criminal court judges to prove they did not withhold evidence of policies against releasing poor misdemeanor defendants from jail; the U.S. Justice Department ordering 23 cities, counties and states to turn over documents that prove their cooperation with federal immigration authorities, renewing threats to cut funding to so-called sanctuary cities; a Michigan judge sentencing former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexually assaulting young female athletes; the European Commission fining technology giant Qualcomm over $1.2 billion Wednesday after finding the company had abused its dominance in the cellphone chipset market and suppressing competition, and more.

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National

Criminal Justice Campaign Director Tarsha Jackson speaking about the bail lawsuit during a press conference outside the Harris County Criminal Justice Center in Houston in May 2017. (Godofredo Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)

1.) The federal judge who forced Texas’ biggest county to overhaul its bail system ordered Harris County criminal judges on Tuesday to prove they did not withhold evidence of policies against releasing poor misdemeanor defendants from jail.

Sammi LeMaster helps to dismantle a large alarm clock display that reads “Net Neutrality Wake Up Call” from the stage after a protest at the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, on Dec. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

2.) The Government Accountability Office is investigating the possibility of fraud and identity theft during the Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rule-making process.

Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, speaks with Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, before the start of a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. (Bill Clark/Associated Press)

3.) President Donald Trump’s pick for a seat on the 7th Circuit Wednesday downplayed Democrats’ concerns about his commitment to following precedent, saying he consistently applied principles set out in prior case while serving as a Wisconsin state court judge.

Immigrant rights advocates speak out against immigration policies of President Donald Trump while placing themselves in mock detention in Albuquerque, N.M., to mark May Day on May 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

4.) The U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday ordered 23 cities, counties and states to turn over documents that prove their cooperation with federal immigration authorities, renewing threats to cut funding to so-called sanctuary cities.

With no apparent indications of a breakthrough in the Senate to avoid a government shutdown, the Capitol is illuminated in Washington, Friday evening, Jan. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

5.) A cynical shred of common ground emerged at an oversight hearing of the Congressional Budget Office as both parties agreed Wednesday that the Senate’s budget process is broken.

Regional

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina listens to Abigayle Bergeron’s victim statement during the sixth day of Larry Nassar’s sentencing hearing Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, in Lansing, Mich.  (Dale G. Young/Detroit News via AP)

6.) After a week of more than 150 wrenching victim-impact statements, a Michigan judge sentenced former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar to 40 to 175 years in prison Wednesday for sexually assaulting young female athletes.

An 1855 painting by Emanuel Leutze shows explorer Christopher Columbus on his flagship the Santa Maria. (Wikimedia Commons)

7.) San Francisco joined dozens of other cities on Tuesday in replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day, a move hailed by some as long overdue but denounced by others as cruel and divisive.

The interior of the Satin Dolls strip club, which served as the filming location for the Bada Bing strip club scenes for “The Sopranos,” series. (AP Photo/Mike Derer, File)

8.) An attorney for a North Carolina strip club argued before the Fourth Circuit Wednesday that an ordinance adopted by the city of Rocky Mount to regulate sexually oriented businesses is overly broad and should be thrown out.

 Science
Then-Vice President Dick Cheney meets with Schwarzenegger for the first time at the White House. (Photo via WhiteHouse.gov)

9.) A newly identified fly species – the smallest one found so far – has been named after an unlikely person: the decidedly not-small fitness and acting superstar Arnold Schwarzenegger.

 

International

10.) The European Commission fined technology giant Qualcomm over $1.2 billion Wednesday after finding the company had abused its dominance in the cellphone chipset market and suppressing competition.

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