Nightly Brief

Your Friday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including two Republican senators making the first known criminal referral in congressional investigations of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, targeting the author of a dossier of allegations about President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia; the hedge fund billionaire Mercer family cut ties with Steve Bannon for derogatory comments attributed to him in “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” a tell-all book that has roiled much of Washington this week; the Seventh Circuit had harsh words for an Indiana law guaranteeing pre-procedure notification to the parents of underage teenagers who are seeking abortions; former Sen. John Edwards and his co-counsel asked a federal judge not to transfer to Japan a class action by hundreds of U.S. sailors exposed to radiation in the Fukushima nuclear disaster, and more.

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Sen. Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Associated Press)

1.) In National news, two Republican senators have made the first known criminal referral in congressional investigations of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, targeting the author of a dossier of allegations about President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia.

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Prime Minister of Australia Malcolm Turnbull, with then-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, center, and then- chief strategist Steve Bannon, right, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Jan. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

2.) The hedge fund billionaire Mercer family cut ties with Steve Bannon for derogatory comments attributed to him in “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” a tell-all by Michael Wolff that has roiled much of Washington this week.

Intel corporate offices are seen in Santa Clara, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

3.) Computer chipmaker Intel faces a major class action filed Wednesday night in what could be the opening salvo in a flood of litigation over two recently discovered security flaws that make most of the world’s computers vulnerable to hacking.

The Hyundai logo on display at the Pittsburgh International Auto Show in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

4.) Fueled by a brain trust of former Google, Tesla and Uber executives, Volkswagen and Hyundai announced Thursday that they are joining forces to tackle the emerging market of self-driving cars.

Photo by Brad Kutner

5.) A group that advocates for indie auto repair shops says a limitation on who can work on automobile computers hurts the free market and allows auto manufacturers to violate a previously agreed upon arrangement, the so-called “right to repair.”

Indiana State Capitol. (Photo by Massimo Catarinella via Wikipedia Commons)

6.) In Regional news, the Seventh Circuit had harsh words Friday for an Indiana law guaranteeing pre-procedure notification to the parents of underage teenagers who are seeking abortions.

Martin Shkreli arrives at federal court in New York, for the fifth day of deliberations at his securities fraud trial on Aug. 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

7.) Defense counsel for the convicted former attorney of pharmaceutical bad boy Martin Shkreli seized Friday on a juror’s newly disclosed misgivings about deliberations.

8.) In International news, former Sen. John Edwards and his co-counsel asked a federal judge not to transfer to Japan a class action by hundreds of U.S. sailors exposed to radiation in the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

 

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