Nightly Brief

Your Monday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including President Donald Trump signing a proclamation to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah; the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court responding critically to federal intrusion of into state lawmaking when it comes to sports gambling; independent engineers say California hasn’t studied the effect of potentially weaker steel in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge thoroughly enough to conclude that the bridge won’t collapse in a major earthquake; defense attorneys for a banker accused of laundering money for Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions told a federal judge that new evidence undermines the credibility of the government’s star witness, and more.

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Tami Sablan and other protesters chant before a visit by President Donald Trump to announce that he is scaling back two sprawling national monuments, Monday Dec. 4, 2017 in Salt Lake City. (Trent Nelson/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP)

1.) In National news President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to “reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens.”

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, left, and New Jersey State Sen. Raymond Lesniak, talk after a news conference at the Supreme Court where a case on sports betting is being heard, Monday, Dec. 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

2.) Forecasting a new era of sanctioned sports gambling, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court were critical Monday of federal intrusion of Congress into state lawmaking.

Economists expect a tax overhaul to provide a modest boost to the U.S. economy but are increasingly worried that a rewrite of the North American Free Trade Agreement will take a toll on growth.(AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

3.) The tax overhaul that cleared an important hurdle on early Saturday will provide a modest boost to the economy, that growth could be dramatically undercut by the pending rewrite of the North American Free Trade Agreement, a survey of economists found on Monday.

Solar PV modules mounted on a rooftop.

4.) The Supreme Court took up a challenge where an Arizona power supplier is accused of hurting solar-power business by setting unfair prices.

Katy Perry performs on stage at the “Witness: The Tour” concert at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.(Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP, File)

5.) In Regional news, jurors in Los Angeles began deliberating Friday whether to slap a restaurateur with punitive damages for her efforts to sweep an abandoned convent out of pop star Katy Perry’s buying hands.

The illuminated San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge as seen from the Embarcadero.

6.) Independent engineers say California hasn’t studied the effect of potentially weaker steel in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge thoroughly enough to conclude that the bridge won’t collapse in a major earthquake.

Former priest John Feit sits in court on Sept. 11, 2017, in Hidalgo County, Texas. The 87-year-old is charged with the 1960 murder of local beauty queen Irene Garza. (ERIK DE LA GARZA, Courthouse News Service)

7.) A South Texas beauty queen struggled to understand why a new Catholic priest kept pulling her from the confessional, days before she vanished on Easter weekend 1960, testimony in John Feit’s murder trial revealed Friday.

In this courtroom sketch, Assistant U.S. Attorney David Denton points at defendant Mehmet Hakan Atilla, right, during opening arguments of a trial, on Nov. 28, 2017, in New York federal court. (Elizabeth Williams via AP)

8.) In International news, defense attorneys for a banker accused of laundering money for Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions told a federal judge Monday that new evidence undermines the credibility of the government’s star witness.

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