Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including human rights organizations urging Congress to investigate immigration detention centers after the death of a 7-year-old at a Georgia facility; a Republican effort to roll expanded oil drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge into the GOP tax reform plan has reignited a long-running debate over how best to protect North America’s largest caribou herd; having prevailed at the Supreme Court against the federal health care law’s contraception mandate, the Little Sisters of the Poor are launching themselves into a new leg of the battle; new genetic evidence suggests nomads migrating into Europe during the Stone Age might have been trying to escape the plague, but instead brought it with them, and more.

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The Stewart Immigration Court is located beside a heavily-secured, 1,900-bed detention center. (AP)

1.) In National news the death of 27-year-old who expired after spending 19 days in solitary confinement at a Georgia immigration detention facility has human rights organizations urging Congress to investigate the centers, which the groups say are violating inmate’s human and civil rights.

A male caribou in Alaska

2.) A Republican effort to roll expanded oil drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge into the GOP tax reform plan has reignited a long-running debate over how best to protect a primary breeding location for North America’s largest caribou herd.

3.) The former director of the Office of Government Ethics filed a complaint against White House adviser Kellyanne Conway on Wednesday for comments she made about the Alabama Senate race.

Little Sisters of the Poor outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments for their case against the contraception mandate in the federal health care law. (Photo courtesy of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty)

4.) After prevailing at the Supreme Court against the federal health care law’s contraception mandate, the Little Sisters of the Poor launched themselves Tuesday into a new leg of the battle.

5.) In Regional news a 34-year-old Louisiana man was sentenced to three years probation and a $2,500 fine after pleading guilty Tuesday to illegally trafficking wild box turtles to Texas in violation of federal wildlife laws.

6.) The Libertarian Party of Georgia claims in court the state’s ballot-access laws are unlawfully cumbersome and were intentionally designed to prevent third-party candidates from successfully running for federal office.

Map of proposed Yersinia pestis circulation throughout Eurasia. A) Entrance of Y. pestis into Europe from Central Eurasia with the expansion of Yamnaya pastoralists around 4,800 years ago. B) Circulation of Y. pestis to Southern Siberia from Europe. Only complete genomes are shown. (Aida Andrades Valtueña. Andrades Valtueña et al. (2017). The Stone Age Plague and its Persistence in Eurasia. Current Biology.)

7.) In Science news, new genetic evidence suggests nomads migrating into Europe during the Stone Age might have been trying to escape the plague, but instead brought it with them.

Nura Mustafic, one of the Mothers of Srebrenica and other Bosnian organizations, wipes away tears as she reacts to the verdict which the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, ICTY, handed down in the genocide trial against former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic, in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday Nov. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

8.) In International news, an unrepentant Ratko Mladic, the bullish Bosnian Serb general whose forces rained shells and snipers’ bullets on Sarajevo and carried out the worst massacre in Europe since World War II, was convicted Wednesday of genocide and other crimes and sentenced to spend the rest of his life behind bars.

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