Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the Ninth Circuit ruling the U.S. Defense Department must reassess the impacts of a controversial new military base on Okinawa in order to protect the endangered Okinawa dugong, a manatee-like marine mammal; as the federal government retreats from banning a pesticide increasingly connected to human health problems, California took steps toward restricting its use in the Golden State; families of five Navy service members who died after responding to the Fukushima nuclear meltdown have sued Tokyo Electric Power Co., blaming the deaths on radiation illnesses contracted from the March 2011 disaster, and more.

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1.) In National news President Donald Trump said it would be “counterproductive” to announce how many more troops he will send to Afghanistan, how U.S. strategy might change, when the war might end, and even what victory might look like, but said there will be no “hasty withdrawal” of U.S. forces. Later, officials put the number of new troops heading to Afghanistan at 3,900.

2.) The U.S. Department of Defense must reassess the impacts of a controversial new military base on Okinawa in order to protect the endangered Okinawa dugong, a manatee-like marine mammal, the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday.

3.) Striking down the government’s approval of a natural gas pipeline that would run from Alabama to Florida, the D.C. Circuit found Tuesday that a federal environmental review gave short shrift to the project’s impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

4.) In Regional news, as the federal government retreats from banning a pesticide increasingly connected to human health problems, particularly in children, the state of California took steps toward restricting its use in the Golden State.

5.) Alaska’s biggest daily newspaper can keep printing after a federal bankruptcy judge late Monday approved a $1 million loan so the Alaska Dispatch News and its creditors can proceed with Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

6.) Phoenix is bracing for protests as President Trump holds a campaign-style rally downtown despite the mayor’s request that he stay away so soon after the neo-Nazi rally and protests in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to three deaths.

7.) The University of California skirted contract guidelines and extended lucrative contracts without soliciting bids from new vendors, the state auditor said Tuesday.

8.) In International news, families of five Navy service members who died after responding to the Fukushima nuclear meltdown have sued Tokyo Electric Power Co., blaming the deaths on radiation illnesses contracted from the March 2011 disaster.

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