Nightly Brief

Your Tuesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including the opening day of the Ninth Circuit’s judicial conference did not flinch at political subjects, with judges hearing a historical overview of three Supreme Court cases arising from the mass incarceration by executive order of 120,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II; California lawmakers extended the state’s emissions tax, calling cap-and-trade a “down payment” for California’s ambitious climate change agenda; a scientist working on the Mars Rover 2020 project told a congressional committee on Tuesday that if successful, samples returned to Earth from the distant planet could change everything about how human beings understand the origin of life, and more.

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Associate Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, right, listens as Sidney Thomas, Chief Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, speaks during the 2017 Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference in San Francisco, Monday, July 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, Pool)

1.) In National news Monday’s opening day of the Ninth Circuit’s judicial conference did not flinch at political subjects, with judges hearing a historical overview of three Supreme Court cases arising from the mass incarceration by executive order of 120,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Associate Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch speaks during a civics program showcase at the 2017 Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference in San Francisco, Monday, July 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, Pool)

2.) New Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch listened as a 15-year-old read a civics essay laden with contemporary relevance on Monday at the Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. walks from his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

3.) Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday he will go forward with a plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a ready replacement, even as three Republican senators announced they would not support the idea.

4.) The Ninth Circuit upheld the FBI’s use of gag orders to muzzle companies about the number and content of national security letters they receive seeking records on their customers without a warrant.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions addresses the summer meeting of the nation’s district attorneys from around the country at the Hilton in Minneapolis, Minn., Monday, July, 17 2017.  (Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via AP)
5.) In another reversal of Obama-era criminal justice policy, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the Justice Department will take steps to make it easier for police to keep property taken from suspected criminals.
Catherine Garoupa joins others critical of Gov. Jerry Brown’s cap-and-trade program, calling for defeat of the bill at a news conference, Monday, July 17, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

6.) In Regional news California lawmakers extended the state’s emissions tax, calling cap-and-trade a “down payment” for California’s ambitious climate change agenda, despite the opposition of several environmental groups.

7.) On the International front, the European Court of Justice ruled Tuesday that transparency trumps states’ expectations of confidentiality in judicial proceedings.

8.) In Science news, a scientist working on the Mars Rover 2020 project told a congressional committee on Tuesday that if successful, samples returned to Earth from the distant planet could change everything about how human beings understand the origin of life.

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