Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including Christopher Wray, the man slated to replace former FBI director James Comey, breaking ranks with President Donald Trump, telling senators he doesn’t  consider special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe a “witch hunt”; a California Senate committee unanimously passed a bill requiring police departments who have chosen to use body cameras to establish procedures for footage to be released; the Second Circuit ruled an ExxonMobil subsidiary cannot enforce a $188 million arbitration award against Venezuela  without complying with the notice requirements of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, and more.

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FBI Director nominee Christopher Wray testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

1.) In National news Christopher Wray, the man slated to replace former FBI director James Comey, appeared to break ranks with President Donald Trump on Wednesday, telling senators he doesn’t  consider special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe a “witch hunt.”

California Gov. Jerry Brown discusses climate change at a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

2.) As the Trump administration abandons progressive climate action in favor of deregulation, California Gov. Jerry Brown and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced a coalition of U.S. states, cities and businesses committed to driving down greenhouse gas emissions “with or without Washington.”

This Nov. 10, 2016 aerial photo released by NASA, shows a rift in the Antarctic Peninsula’s Larsen C ice shelf. (1.12 trillion U.S. tons).(John Sonntag/NASA via AP)

3.) In Environmental news scientists said Wednesday vast iceberg with twice the volume of Lake Erie has broken off from a key floating ice shelf in Antarctica.

4.) On the Regional front five registered Florida voters and the American Civil Liberties Union sued the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, claiming the Trump administration panel is violating their privacy rights by attempting to collect their personal data.

5.) A California Senate committee unanimously passed a bill requiring police departments who have chosen to use body cameras to establish procedures for footage to be released.

6.) With California retailers slated to begin selling legal marijuana in less than six months, a state Republican is seeking strict safeguards that would prevent retailers from marketing pot to kids.

7.) A federal judge said he will hold anti-abortion activist David Daleiden’s lawyers in contempt of court for publishing videos of a National Abortion Federation annual meeting, in violation of an injunction.

8.) In International news an ExxonMobil subsidiary cannot enforce a $188 million arbitration award against Venezuela for nationalizing its oil industry without complying with the notice requirements of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, the Second Circuit ruled.

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