Nightly Brief

Your Wednesday night briefing from the staff of Courthouse News

Top CNS stories for today including House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana was among five people shot Wednesday when a gunman opened fire at a congressional baseball practice;Texas Governor Greg Abbott called cities’ protection of trees “socialistic” and he announced a top priority for a special legislative session he’s called will be giving property owners the right to cut down trees whether their cities like it or not; Europe’s high court took a no-nonsense approach to vegan-food substitutes Wednesday, barring companies from using terms like “cheese” or “cream” on nonanimal products, and more.

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In this April 17, 2012, photo, James Hodgkinson protests outside of the United States Post Office in Downtown Belleville, Ill (Derik Holtmann/Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

1.) In National news House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana was among six people shot Wednesday when a gunman opened fire at a congressional baseball practice, officials say. The shooter, identified as James T. Hodgkinson, was shot by police and has died at a local hospital.

President Donald Trump, joined by first lady Melania Trump, speaks during the Ford’s Theatre Annual Gala at the Ford’s Theatre in Washington, Sunday, June 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

2.) Nearly 200 Democratic members of Congress filed a federal complaint Wednesday against President Donald Trump, saying his vast international business holdings violate a centuries-old anti-bribery provision of the U.S. Constitution.

The multiple benefits of energy efficiency improvements as depicted in a recent report from the International Energy Agency.

3.) Eleven states and the city of New York zapped the U.S. Department of Energy with a federal lawsuit Tuesday, claiming its failure to roll out new efficiency standards for appliances will lead to more planet-warming carbon emissions and higher costs for consumers.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette announces manslaughter charges Wednesday in the Flint water crisis. (Andy Olesko/CNS).

4.) Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette on Wednesday charged the head of the state health department with involuntary manslaughter for his role in the Flint water crisis and related Legionnaires’ disease outbreak, and also charged others associated with the lead-contamination scandal that has plagued the distressed city for more than three years.

5.) In Regional news, Texas Governor Greg Abbott called cities’ protection of trees “socialistic” and he announced a top priority for the special legislative session he’s called will be giving property owners the right to cut down trees whether their cities protect them or not.

6.) The Ninth Circuit cautiously signaled Tuesday that it may reverse parts of former Tribune Publishing employee Matthew Keys’ conviction for helping hackers from the group Anonymous deface the Los Angeles Times website in 2010.

7.) A federal judge Tuesday found that it a simple call that the California Department of Public Health unlawfully fined a medical-waste disposal company $567,000 for disposing of biohazardous materials out of state.
8.) In International news Europe’s high court took a no-nonsense approach to vegan-food substitutes Wednesday, barring companies from using terms like “cheese” or “cream” on nonanimal products.
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