Man Should’ve Heeded Court’s ‘Quaint’ Rules

     (CN) – A man acquitted on a weapons charge can’t appeal an unfavorable verdict in his case against Chicago police, the 7th Circuit ruled, explaining that he “failed to meet our quaint rules on timing of appeals.”




     The court said Ibrihim Kiswani filed his notice of appeal 10 days late, after a jury rejected Kiswani’s malicious prosecution claim and a magistrate judge denied his motion for a new trial.
     The appeal’s tardiness forced the Chicago-based court to focus solely on the denial of Kiswani’s motion for reconsideration, which the court also deemed “untimely” and “improper.”
     Kiswani had been arrested outside a nightclub in July 2004 and charged with aggravated unlawful use of a weapon. After he was acquitted of the charge, he sued several Chicago police officers for unlawful arrest, malicious prosecution, civil conspiracy, due process violations and unlawful deprivation of property.
     The claims against all but one officer were settled before trial, and a jury sided with the remaining officer.
     The order denying Kiswani’s bid for a new trial was entered on Aug. 20, 2008, but Kiswani didn’t file a notice of appeal until Sept. 29, 2008.

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