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Iran Says It Captured CIA-Trained Operatives

The Iranian Intelligence Ministry announced Monday it had captured 17 Iranian citizens it believes were trained by America’s CIA. President Donald Trump took to Twitter hours later to claim the reports were false.

By JACK RODGERS

Judge Halts Subpoenas of Trump’s Finance Info

A federal judge on Friday put a temporary halt on subpoenas from congressional Democrats for President Donald Trump’s tax records after an appeals court ordered the judge to take a second look at the issue.

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By JON PARTON

Devouring a Smaller Galaxy Gave Milky Way Its Size and Shape

The structure and size of the Milky Way is a direct result of our galaxy consuming a far smaller galaxy nearly 10 billion years ago, a study revealed Monday.

By CARSON MCCULLOUGH

Administration Delays Enforcement of Abortion Restriction

The Trump administration is giving taxpayer-funded family planning clinics more time to comply with its new rule that they no longer can refer women for abortions.

UK in Crisis With Boris Johnson Set to Become Next PM

The United Kingdom, already rattled by Brexit and tensions with Iran, enters a new and unsettling crisis point this week with the pending ascendancy of former London Mayor Boris Johnson, the man likely to take over No. 10 Downing Street and become the leader of the world’s fifth-largest economy and one of its strongest militaries.

By CAIN BURDEAU

Race to the White House

Iowa State Fair A Battleground for 2020 Democrats

The Iowa State Fair is an extravaganza that attracts upwards of 1 million visitors over 11 days for midway thrills, livestock shows, music and every kind of food on a stick imaginable. This year’s fair will also bring in Democratic presidential candidates eager to plunge into the sweaty crowds and be seen by national media.

By ROX LAIRD

Klobuchar: Trump Afraid of Woman President

Mentioning last week’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Amy Klobuchar Klobuchar said at Northern Iowa’s “Wing Ding” fundraiser Friday, President Donald Trump has stoked fear and hate nationwide. “He is afraid of” the National Rifle Association and having “a woman in the White House,” she added.

By AP
William Jennings Bryan, played by George Miller, delivers an argument for the prosecution in a production of “Front Page News” held in the Rhea County Courthouse. (Daniel Jackson/CNS)

Scopes Trial Reenacted in Courtroom Where It All Went Down

At the anniversary of the trial that pitted evolution versus creationism and put a Tennessee town on the map, all the courtroom’s a stage and lawyers mere players.

By DANIEL JACKSON

Nadler: Mueller Hearing to Air Evidence of Trump Wrongdoing

The House Judiciary Committee chairman said Sunday that this week’s hearing with Robert Mueller will air “very substantial evidence” of wrongdoing by President Donald Trump and make a public case for impeachment. Republicans pledged sharp questioning of the special counsel about what they see as a “one-sided” Russia investigation.

Judge Leans Toward Slash of $2 Billion Roundup Cancer Verdict

A federal judge correctly predicted that $2 billion in punitive damages awarded to a Livermore, California, couple who attributed their cancer to the weed killer Roundup would likely be drastically cut down – though by how much remains to be seen.

By MARIA DINZEO
The moon is seen during a complete lunar eclipse over  Jakarta, Indonesia, on  Aug. 28, 2018. Skywatchers around much of the world are looking forward to a complete lunar eclipse that will be the longest this century. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)

Craters at Moon's Poles May Hold Millions of Tons of Ice

Americans from Texas to Maine sweated out a steamy Saturday as a heat wave canceled events from festivals to horse races and pushed New York City to order power-saving steps to avoid overtaxing the electrical grid.

By VICTORIA PRIESKOP

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By MILT POLICZER

Kid Stuff

Here’s a question for you: Where do Googles come from? You’ve probably used Google for years without wondering where these benevolent, informative creatures originated, but you should be able to guess.

Suit Over Iowa Ban on Medicaid for Trans Care Tossed

An Iowa judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by two transgender Iowans and a gay rights advocacy group challenging the constitutionality of a law that exempts sex reassignment operations from coverage under the state’s Medicaid program.

By ROX LAIRD

NYC Owes Cabbies Hearing on License Suspensions

Reviving a suit by taxi drivers who endured license suspensions after criminal arrests, the Second Circuit ruled Friday that New York City did not give the drivers a fair hearing, as is due with their very livelihoods on the line.

By ADAM KLASFELD

Read the Nightly Brief

DC Circuit Affirms Conviction of Capitol Gun-Toter

A year and a half after his victory at the Supreme Court, the D.C. Circuit on Friday rejected an argument from a self-proclaimed “constitutional bounty hunter” that his 2014 guilty plea should be invalidated because a ban on guns on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol is a violation of the Second Amendment.

By TIM RYAN

Former Employee Files Suit Against Tesla After Whistleblower Complaint

Following a whistleblower complaint filed last year, a former Tesla employee filed a federal lawsuit in Nevada Friday against the company and CEO Elon Musk, claiming he was wrongfully let go from his job after filing the complaint.

By JON PARTON

Pakistani Hospital Hit by Female Suicide Bomber, 9 Killed

A female suicide bomber struck outside a hospital in Pakistan on Sunday as the wounded were being brought in from an earlier shooting against police, in a complex assault claimed by the Pakistani Taliban that killed a total of nine people and wounded another 30.

Judge Unseals Warrant Used to Search Journalist's Phone

The public will soon learn what information San Francisco police used to seize a reporter’s phone records in violation of California’s journalist shield law after an 11-page warrant was ordered unsealed Thursday.

By NICHOLAS IOVINO
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks during a news conference announcing the indictment against international computer hacking, at Department of Justice in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018. The Justice Department says two Iranian computer hackers have been charged in connection with multimillion-dollar cybercrime and extortion scheme that targeted U.S. government agencies and businesses. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Justice Credits Reforms With Spurring Inmate Releases

More than 3,100 inmates will be released from federal custody Friday as a result of sentencing changes made in the sweeping criminal-justice reform bill that became law in December.

By TIM RYAN
In this undated photo issued Friday July 19, 2019, by Stena Bulk, showing the British oil tanker Stena Impero at unknown location, which is believed to have been captured by Iran.  Iran’s Revolutionary Guard announced on their website Friday July 19, 2019, it has seized a British oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz, the latest provocation in a strategic waterway that has become a flashpoint in the tensions between Tehran and the West. (Stena Bulk via AP)

Iran Says Seizure of British Ship a 'Reciprocal' Move

Officials from Iran said Saturday that the seizure of a British oil tanker was a ‘reciprocal’ move in response to Britain’s detainment of an Iranian supertanker earlier this month.

By JON PARTON

Pentagon Studies ‘Hyperfit’ Women Soldiers

In the nearly four years since the Pentagon announced it was opening all combat jobs to women, at least 30 have earned the Army Ranger tab, two have graduated from Marine infantry school and three have passed the grueling initial assessment phase for Green Beret training.

In this May 7, 2009, file photo, author, comedian and co-founder of the Yippie party as well as stand-up satirist, Paul Krassner, 77, poses for a photo at his home in Desert Hot Springs, Calif. Krassner, the publisher, author and radical political activist on the front lines of 1960s counterculture who helped tie together his loose-knit prankster group by naming them the Yippies, has died. His daughter, Holly Krassner Dawson, says Krassner died Sunday, July 21, 2019, at his home in Desert Hot Springs, Calif. He was 87. (AP Photo/Eric Reed, File)

1960s Prankster Paul Krassner, of Yippies Fame, Dies at 87

Paul Krassner, the publisher, author and radical political activist on the front lines of 1960s counterculture who helped tie together his loose-knit prankster group by naming them Yippies, died Sunday in Southern California, his daughter said.

Equifax headquarters in Atlanta. (AP photo)

Equifax to Pay Up to $700 Million for Data Breach

Equifax will pay up to $700 million to settle with the U.S. and states over a 2017 data breach that exposed Social Security numbers and other private information of nearly 150 million people.

Ukrainian Leader's Party Gets Parliamentary Majority

Early results show that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s party won a majority of seats in Sunday’s parliamentary election.

Israeli forces destroy a building in a Palestinian village of Sur Baher, east Jerusalem, Monday, July 22, 2019. Israel says the 10 buildings, located on the West Bank side of the security barrier, were erected too close to the structure. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Israel Destroys Palestinian Homes in East Jerusalem

Israeli work crews on Monday began demolishing dozens of Palestinian homes in an east Jerusalem neighborhood, in one of the largest operations of its kind in years.

Representatives for India and Italy offer opening statements in the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, Netherlands. (Photo courtesy of the PCA)

Jurisdiction Fought in International Maritime Shooting

India and Italy wrapped up hearings Saturday over jurisdiction in the 2012 killing of two Indian fishermen by Italian sailors in international waters.

By MOLLY QUELL

Walt Girdner was born in central Iowa in 1922, one of five children. His father took a job as a Christian minister in Alameda after the family moved to California in 1925. Growing up during the Great Depression, Walt worked double shifts at a cannery to make money for college. He attended Stanford where he put together a string of letters and wins, running the quarter and half-mile. An invitation to join the U.S. Olympic team was negated by World War II and cancellation of the games. During the war, he disembarked in Normandy, fought in the infantry and marched into Germany .

As a young man, he developed an interest in imagery, first through drawing then through the developing technology of photography. Although he left the church where his mother and father were pastors, he kept a lifelong faith in the power and mystery of the natural environment, seeing in its beauty an overriding and everlasting spiritual force. His subjects focused on people and their settings. Farmers, flower sellers, youth were recurring themes.

He traveled in large part to find new images and capture them, in France at first, then the rest of Europe and later Africa and Mexico. Towards the end of his life, Walt focused on images in nature, including letters and numbers that emerged through abalone shells, beach tableaus and patterns in the sand.  He had faith that imagery was a powerful way to communicate and believed young people were much better at interpreting the language of imagery, gifted with imaginations more agile and unencumbered.

 

Puerto Rico Prepares for Massive Protest Against Governor

In the nearly four years since the Pentagon announced it was opening all combat jobs to women, at least 30 have earned the Army Ranger tab, two have graduated from Marine infantry school and three have passed the grueling initial assessment phase for Green Beret training.

Puerto Rico Prepares for Massive Protest Against Governor

In the nearly four years since the Pentagon announced it was opening all combat jobs to women, at least 30 have earned the Army Ranger tab, two have graduated from Marine infantry school and three have passed the grueling initial assessment phase for Green Beret training.

Puerto Rico Prepares for Massive Protest Against Governor

In the nearly four years since the Pentagon announced it was opening all combat jobs to women, at least 30 have earned the Army Ranger tab, two have graduated from Marine infantry school and three have passed the grueling initial assessment phase for Green Beret training.

Puerto Rico Prepares for Massive Protest Against Governor

In the nearly four years since the Pentagon announced it was opening all combat jobs to women, at least 30 have earned the Army Ranger tab, two have graduated from Marine infantry school and three have passed the grueling initial assessment phase for Green Beret training.

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