From Italians to Finns: Youth Stats in the EU

     (CN) – Italian men stay at home until they are in their 30s while the Finns leave home as soon as possible, in their early 20s, according to a new report on European youth released by the EU’s statistical agency. Young people in Iceland go most often to live events while the Germans are the most avid moviegoers.




     Seventy-seven percent of Europeans aged 16 to 29 went to the movies in the prior year, reports a study from 2006. But only 37 percent of those over 30 had gone to the movies.
     Germany had the highest proportion of young going to the movies, at 85 percent. Bulgaria had the lowest movie turnout, at 38 percent.
     Fifty-four percent of 16-29 year-old Europeans went to a live event, like a play or concert, in the prior year. Iceland had the highest proportion, at 83 percent. Malta had the lowest, at 29 percent.
     Forty percent of Europeans older than 30 went to a live event during the prior year.
     Forty-nine percent of Europeans between the ages of 16 and 29 went to some kind of museum or art gallery. Finns went the most often at 63 percent. Those in Malta went the least often, at 14 percent.
     Almost 40 percent of youth workers had a temporary work contract in 2008, with this number falling to less than 10 percent for the 30 through 54 age group.
      Across Europe, women leave the house before men, but the driving difference is nationality. The Finnish leave their homes the earliest, with men leaving at the age of 23, on average, and women leaving when they are 22, on average.
     Youth in Slovenia and Slovakia leave home the latest, with men leaving at the age of 31, on average and women leaving when they are 29.

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