Julio Iglesias' Agent Sues Over Cyprus Gig

     WASHINGTON (CN) - Concert promoters in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus tricked a talent agency to book Julio Iglesias for a performance at a hotel that would have violated U.S. and international law, International Creative Talent Agency claims in Federal Court.
     The talent agency sued Net Holdings, Voyager Kibris Ltd. dba Merit Crystal Hotel & Casino, and Onur Unal, of Turkey, alleging fraud with malice, conspiracy, detrimental reliance, and intentional and negligent misrepresentation.
     According to the lawsuit, the Merit Crystal Hotel is owned by a Greek Cypriot, but was seized by Voyager under the auspices of Northern Cyprus, a state not recognized by the United States and widely criticized for running its area on the Republic of Cyprus through brute military force.
     "In complete disregard for the laws of the Republic of Cyprus and the lawful property owner upon whose property the concert was to be performed under the falsified name 'Merit Crystal Hotel & Casino,' the defendants, including Unal, colluded and conspired to conceal the illegality of their conduct and identity of the true owner to obtain the contract for the performance of Julio Iglesias and then to threaten, harass and intimidate ICTA based on false and deceptive representations," the complaint states.
     Iglesias did not give the forbidden concert.
     The talent agency sued Northern Cyprus in 2011 for breach of contract after Iglesias backed out of the deal, but U.S. District Judge James Boasberg dismissed the case , stating that "plaintiff's contract claims against the TRNC are puzzling given that Iglesias, not defendants, terminated the contract, which the TRNC was not even a party to."
     In the present case, the talent agency claims that Voyager, Net Holdings and Unal defrauded Iglesias into accepting the gig, then threatened the agency when he backed out.
     In a related dispute, Voyager sued the agency in 2011, claiming that Iglesias canceled the show and kept the money.
     ICTA asks the court to declare that it has no liability for canceling the concert, and wants the Northern Cyprus defendants to pay it compensatory and punitive damages to be determined at trial.
     The agency is represented by Athan Tsimpedes.