Seizure and Forfeiture Listings to Be on Internet

     WASHINGTON (CN) - U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has adopted a new rule that nixes the requirement of publishing civil and criminal seizure and forfeiture listings in print publications. Prior regulations required property the Border Patrol intended to seize, and property forfeited by individuals or groups, be published in a newspaper for 21 consecutive days, in the geographic location where the seizure/forfeitures took place.
     The property is split into two groups, property appraised at more than $5,000 and less than $5,000.
     The new rule requires those lists be published on the U.S. government forfeiture website at www.forfeiture.gov. However, notifications can still be published in print media on a case-by-case basis, depending on recommendations of the U.S. Attorney's office or court of jurisdiction.
     The agency said it believes that, "using the Internet to publish CBP seizure and forfeiture notices will provide notice to a broader range of the public without the geographical limitations that exist under the current procedure's reliance solely on local print publications or customhouse postings. Under this final rule, Internet posting will be available for a longer period of time (30 days) compared to the minimum statutory requirement of 21 days. This final rule provides CBP the discretion to publish notice in a print medium when CBP determines that additional outreach would be appropriate. In addition to these advantages, CBP expects that Internet publishing will provide savings to the government."
     U.S. Customs and Border Protection is an agency that exists under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.